This is the 4-H way to the
State Fair Show off your skills
FLORAL HALL 

FORAL HALL 4-H
Barren Co. Fairgrounds, Temple Hill, KY 

When
Friday, July  11th 2019
7:00 pm C.S.T.
​Members of Barren County 4-H clubs could submit entries to be judged in the Barren County Fair 4-H Floral Hall between 9 a.m. and noon Thursday at the Barren County Extension Service office. Entries could be in any of nearly 380 classes within 21 divisions and ranged from eggs to eggplant, from photos of flowers to container gardens, and from baseballs on a wreath to apple pie -- and even a knife that might have been used to cut into that dessert. Winners in all but the four "miscellaneous" classes will be eligible to enter their projects in the competition at the Kentucky State Fair in August.
BARREN COUNTY
Cooperative Extension
EXCELLENT FOOD & CONCESSIONS.​

BARREN COUNTY FAIR FLORAL HALL
July 11-12, 2019 4-H DIVISION

Superintendent - Paula Tarry, Barren County Extension Agent for 4-H Youth Development

​​RULES

(1) All entries must be entered between 9:00-12:00, Thursday, July 11, 2019, at the Barren County Extension Office.
(2) Entries should be picked up between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. on Friday, July 12, 2019.
(3) The Danish System of judging will be used with the top entry in each class designated.
(4) Ribbons awarded in the Danish System: $3.00 blue ribbon; $2.00 red ribbon and $1.00 white ribbon.
(5) All entries must meet minimum standards to receive a ribbon.
(6) Eligibility:
(a)Age -Any 4-H’er who has passed his/her 9th birthday, or is in the 4th grade as of Jan. 1 of the current year, but has not passed his/her 19th birthday as of Jan. 1 of the current year. (Exception - designated pre 4-H classes)
(b) Participation – Exhibitor must have carried an approved project, of which the exhibit is a part, under the general supervision of the Cooperative Extension Service of the University of Kentucky.
(c) Residence - Entry in the 4-H Section is open only to Barren County 4-H members.
(d) Exhibitors must conform to the:
1a. General Rules listed here plus General Rules of Barren County Fair and
2b. Specific Rules governing the department in which entries are made.
(7) All 4-H’ers must exhibit their own projects. Only one exhibit per class per exhibitor is allowed.
All entries must be for the present 4-H year.
(8) The decision of the judges is final.
(9) The Barren County Extension Service will not be responsible for any loss or damage to the exhibitor injury to the exhibitor or to the spectators; however, the utmost care will be used to prevent loss or injury.
DIVISION 6029 – 4-H ARTS
SECTION A: Portfolio Pathways


Painting

727a. JuniorAcrylic Still Life: (pg.12) Using acrylic paint to
create a Still Life.
727b. Senior Acrylic Still Life: (pg.12) same as Junior.
728a. Junior Water Color: (pg.14) Using watercolors and a
variety of techniques to complete a painting on watercolor
paper.
728b. SeniorWater Color: (pg. 14) same as Junior.
729a. Junior Abstract: (pg.18) Using acrylic paints experiment
with abstract designs to complete a painting.
729b. Senior Abstract: (pg. 18) same as Junior
730a. Junior Sand Painting: (pg.20) On an 8”x10” x1/4”
sanded plywood or particleboard. Explore painting with colored
sand mixed with glue.
730b. Senior Sand Painting: (pg.20) same as Junior.
731a. Junior Self Portrait: (pg.22) Using acrylic or watercolor
paints. Complete a self- portrait using any drawing or painting
technique.
731b. Senior Self Portrait: (pg. 22) same as Junior.
732a. Junior Human Action: (pg.24) Using acrylic or watercolor
paints, capture human action through the use of vivid
colors, lines, and texture when painting.
732b. Senior Human Action: (pg.24) same as Junior.
733a. Junior Oil Painting: (pg.26) Using oils on canvas or
canvas board. Experiment with different techniques of laying
oil to canvas to create a finished painting.
733b. Senior Oil Painting: (pg.26) same as Junior.
734a. Junior Oil Landscape: (pg.30) On a 16”x18” stretched
and primed canvas, canvas board or sheet of masonite coated
in gesso. Layout a one-point landscape perspective drawing
and use oil paints to show atmosphere and distance.
734b. Senior Oil Landscape: (pg.30) same as Junior.

Printing

735a. Junior Intaglio Collagraph Print: (pg.38) On 8 ½” x
11” paper. Create a collagraph block at least 6” wide and create
any color print using the intaglio printing method.
735b. Senior Intaglio Collagraph print: same as Junior.
736a. Junior Blueprint Paper Print: (pg.40) On blueprint
paper create a sun print; at least 5 ½ x 8 ½ in. using cyanotype
or Light or sun-sensitive paper.
736b. Senior Blueprint Paper Print: same as Junior.
737a. Junior Etched Plexiglas: (pg. 42) Create an original
print using an etched Plexiglas plate. The print should be at
least 5 ½”x 81/2” in. Plexiglas etching uses the intaglio
method of printing.
737b. Senior Etched Plexiglas: same as Junior.
738a. Junior Wax Resist Print: (pg.44) Create intricate designs
for printing using a wax-resist method.
738b. SeniorWax Resist Print: same as Junior.
739a Junior Tire Stamp Print: (pg.46) Cut pieces of inner tube
tire, glue it onto a woodblock, and print using a stamp pad.
739b Senior Tire Stamp Print: same as Junior.
740a Junior Linoleum Print: (pg.48) Create linoleum print
using linoleum block on paper.
740b. Senior Linoleum Print: same as Junior
741a. Junior Hand Drawn Negative Photograph: (pg.51)You
will draw a negative on frosted acetate, then print onto photographic paper (8”x10” in.) as a positive, using a photographic
process.
741b. Senior Hand Drawn Negative Photograph: same as
Junior.

Graphic Design

743a. Junior 5 Color Design: (pg.62-63) Create (2) two 8”x
10” in. landscapes. 5 color designs are identical except for (1)
one color. Change (1) one color to create a second design.
Use paint, paper or computer graphics program. Mount on a
matt board.
743b. Senior 5 Color Design: same as Junior
744a. Junior Computer Drawing: (pg.70) Explore the use of
computer tools and techniques to doodle, draw and replicate
images. Print out each design showing the use of various tools.
744b. Senior Computer Drawing: same as Junior.
Section B: Sketchbook Crossroads Drawing
745a. Junior Contour Drawing: (pg.12) Draw objects using
the contour drawing method. Do 2-3 drawings of the same
object from different angles.
745b. Senior Contour Drawing: same as Junior
746a. Junior Two Point Perspective: (pg. 16) On sketch
paper, draw a two-point perspective that has a point at each
end of a horizontal segment.
746b. Senior Two Point Perspective: same as Junior.
747a. Junior Circular Shape Object: (pg.18) Draw a subject
to fit a circular shape.
747b. Senior Circular Shape Object: same as Junior.
748a. Junior Color Pencil: (pg.20) Draw with colored pencils
and use terpenoid to blend the colors.
748b. Senior Color Pencil: same as Junior.
749a. Junior Pen and Ink: (pg.22) Sketch animals or other
objects using pen and ink.
749b. Senior Pen and Ink: same as Junior
750a. Junior Calligraphy: (pg. 24) On 8 ½ by 11 paper,
rewrite a quote, poem or pledge using Calligraphy. Make sure
to include the author on the piece.
750b. Senior Calligraphy: Same as Junior
751a. Junior Cartooning: (pg.27) Cartooning is a simple
process of making line drawings show sequential motion.
Create your own cartoon character showing motion. Must
create at least three blocks.
751b. Senior Cartooning: same as Junior.

Fiber Arts

752 a. Junior FeltedWoolApplique Mat: (pg31) Felt wool to
create a design. Applique design to a felted wool mat. Max
size of mat 18” x 24” in. Use 100% wool to felt.
752 b. Senior FeltedWool Applique Mat: same as Junior.
753 a. Junior Cotton Linter Bowl: (pg. 34) Experiment with
cotton linter using molds and shaping the linter to form
bowls. Enhance the cotton with colored pencils, threads,
floss, dried flowers to make a unique creation.
753b. Senior Cotton Linter Bowl: same as Junior.
754 a. Junior Batik Fabric: (pg.37) Using natural fiber fabric. 

Create a unique fiber artwork using dyes and the wax-resist method.


754 b. Senior Batik Fabric: same as Junior.
755 a. Junior Lap Loom Woven Place Mat: (pg.40) Set up a
lap loom. Using several colors or types of yarn creates a
woven placemat.
755 b. Senior Lap LoomWoven Place Mat: same as Junior
756 a. Junior Inkle Loom Basket: (pg.44) Weave 4-6 stripes
that are identical. Sculpt a basket out of several woven strips
by stitching them together in a spiral. Manipulate the strips to
form the bottom of the basket.
756 b. Senior Inkle Loom Basket: same as Junior.

Sculpting

757a. Junior Clay Container: (pg.55) Create a functional container
from clay either self-hardening or firing required.
757 b. Senior Clay Container: same as Junior.
758 a. Junior Clay Bust: (pg.57) Sculpt a head with facial features
out of clay.
758 b. Senior Clay Bust: same as Junior
759 a. Junior Mask: (pg.61) Create a mask using clay emphasizing
unique form and texture to portray feelings.
759 b. Senior Mask: same as Junior
760 a. Junior Cardboard Sculpture: (pg.65) Create a piece of
textured relief sculpture using corrugated cardboard stacked
and glued together. Sculpt with an Exacto® knife.
760 b. Senior Cardboard Sculpture: same as Junior.
761 a. Junior FlowerWire Sculpture: (pg.67) Using wire and
nylon cloth creates a freestanding flower sculpture.
761 b. Senior FlowerWire Sculpture: same as Junior.
762 a. Junior Plaster of Paris Carving: (pg.69) Using plaster
of Paris block, carve a form that has a concave and convex
surface and allows space to flow around and through it.
762 b. Senior Plaster of Paris Carving: same as Junior
Section C: Art Trends and Traditions
This section will be highlighting the latest trends in art while
honoring our heritage. Art trends will be selected every two
years. Heritage crafts will be open to any heritage craft. Documentation
for the Heritage Craft Classes is REQUIRED. If required documentation is not attached the item will be disqualified. 

You may enter one entry per year in this section.

763 a. JuniorArt Trends – Mixed Media. Mixed media is defined
as employing more than one medium.
763 b. Senior Art Trends—Mixed Media
764 a. Junior Heritage Craft- See below for definition.
764 b. Senior Heritage Craft.
764 c. Junior Basket Making—natural materials any size,
shape or design.
764 d. Senior Basket Making—natural materials any size,
shape or design.
764 e. Junior Jewelry—one piece of jewelry created by youth.
No kits or pony beads allowed. No elastic material used to
string beads. Glass, clay or wooden beads (painted or carved)
permitted only. Examples: earring(s) and necklace or bracelet
and necklace, etc.
764 f. Senior Jewelry same junior
764 g. Junior Leather craft—kits allowed
764 h. Senior Leather craft-no kits allowed
TOBACCO DIVISIONS AND CLASSES
Burley Division – Stripped
All 4-H Burley should be entered as
Division of 2101.

Class No.
5 Flying
6 Lug
7 Leaf
8 Tip
Burley - Best Crop
Class No. 15 Best Crop, 4-H, 4 grades

Entries shall be on an individual basis and must be produced
by the exhibitor. Only one entry per individual is permitted
and entry shall consist of four grades: Flying, Lugs, Leaf, and Tips. Each grade shall consist of two hands of 20 leaves
each and samples entered in Classes 6 through 10 shall not be
considered for this class. An engraved plaque will be awarded
to the 4-H individual exhibiting the most outstanding entry in
classes 5 through 8 and 15. In the case of a tie, a point system
will be used in awarding plaques.
Dark Tobacco 

All 4-H Dark Tobacco should be entered
as Division 2102.


Entries shall be on an individual basis and must be produced
by the exhibitor. One entry per individual is permitted and
 entry shall consist of four grades:
Wrappers, Heavy BrownLeaf, Dark Leaf, and Thin Brown Leaf.

Samples entered in classes
16 through 23 shall not be considered for this division.
Class No. 26 4-H Best Crop
(2 hands – 20 leaves each grade)
4-H Class Green Dark Tobacco (By Sticks):
Class No. 31 Dark
Growing Dark Tobacco Plant
Class No. 33 Best potted growing plant of Dark Tobacco, any
type

Green Stick and Potted Burley Tobacco should be entered
as Division 2103.


4-H Class Green Tobacco (by sticks):
Class No. 36 Burley
Class No. 39 Best potted growing plant of Burley Tobacco.
DIVISION 6011.4
EDUCATIONAL 4-H DOG PROJECT POSTERS


543 Junior (age 9-13) 544 Senior (age 14-19)

DIVISION 6015
4-H HORTICULTURE & PLANT SCIENCE


The youth should NOT use garden soil in containers. Use well-drained,
disease-free potting soil for all containers.


561. Environmental Awareness (Such as but not limited to:)
Aone-page description of the project must accompany entry item
(type or printed neatly) to be eligible for entry.
A. Tree planting on city property, roadways, parks, etc.
B. Home landscaping
C. Composting

562. Production and Marketing (such as but not limited to):
A. Vegetable garden planted for home and/or market use.
B. The planting, production, or management of fruit plantings.
C. The planting, production, or management of trees, shrubs,
greenhouse crops or garden perennials.

563. Experimental Horticulture (such as, but not limited to:)
Aone-page description of the project must accompany entry item
(type or printed neatly) to be eligible for entry.
A. "Science Fair" type of exhibit involving experimental
work with plants
B. Comparison of different varieties of vegetables or annual
flowers
C. Comparison of mulching or other cultural practices

564 Horticultural Project Exhibits (such as but not limited
to:) A one-page description of the project must accompany the entry
item (type or printed neatly) to be eligible for entry.
A. How to propagate plants
B. How to force spring bulbs
C. How to start seeds
D. How to graft cacti
E. How to dry herbs

Plant Display: Youth should NOT use garden soil in containers.
Use well-drained, disease-free potting soil for all containers.


565. Terrariums
566. Dish gardens (desert or tropical)
567. Vegetable container gardens (grown in
a container - not dug out of the garden)
568. Annual container gardens - (non-vegetable)
569. House plants
570. Hanging baskets
571. Herb Container Garden
572. Window Box Display
573. Upcycle Container Garden (Previously used container
recycled, example, wood pallet garden)
Garden and/or Orchard Displays
574. The exhibitor may exhibit as many different fruits and/or
vegetables from their garden as desired. Any size or type
(minimum of five types) of products may be displayed in the
2 X 3 area provided for each exhibit. The exhibit must be in
a display container (box or basket) which can be easily
moved. Vegetables will not be returned to the exhibitor. They
will be judged as follows:

Quality of Produce 40%
The attractiveness of Container 30%
Uniformity and true-to-type ness 10%
Number of different types 15%
Labeling 5%


4-H'ers may also exhibit plates of vegetables. A white paper
plate for vegetables must be supplied by the exhibitor. These
vegetables will not be returned to the exhibitor. Classes of
vegetables will be limited to:


575. Tomato (5 per plate) Must be ripe (red or yellow color
only) cherry type
576. Tomato (5 per plate) beef steak
577. Tomato (5 per plate) heirloom
578. Peppers, hot (5 per plate)
579. Peppers – bell (5 per plate)
580. Peppers – sweet (5 per plate)
581. Cucumbers, slicing (5 per plate)
582. Cucumbers, pickling (5 per plate)
583. Beans, snap or lima (12 per plate)
584. Corn, sweet (in the husk with silks) (5 ears per plate)
585. Cantaloupe (1 whole), halved

They will be judged as follows:


Condition 25%
Quality 20%
Uniformity 20%
True-To Type 20%
Size 15%


Consult Exhibiting and Judging Vegetables (4BC-08PO) to
learn the characteristics of these criteria.
The largest vegetable may not be the highest quality, nevertheless,
it is unique. The largest entry in each of the following
classes will receive a class champion ribbon.


586. Largest Tomato (by weight) Must be ripe
(red or yellow color only)
588. Largest Pumpkin (by weight)
589. Largest Watermelon (by weight)
project original design.
​​DIVISION 6018 - 4-H CROPS PROJECT

LEGUME HAY:


600. Alfalfa hay, ½ bale (no full bales accepted) from the current
year's project crop, neatly tied and labeled.
601. Red clover hay, ½ bale (no full bales accepted) from the
current year's project crop, neatly tied and labeled.

GRASS HAY:

602. Timothy Hay, ½ bale (no full bales accepted) from this
current year's project crop, neatly tied and labeled. Place hay
in a double strength plastic bag.
603. Other Grass Hay, ½ bale (no full bales accepted) from the
current year's project crop, neatly tied and labeled. Place hay
in a double strength plastic bag.

MIXED HAY:

604. Mixed Hay, ½ bale (no full bales accepted) from the current
year's project crop, neatly tied and labeled.

YELLOW CORN:

605. Yellow-ear, from the previous year's crop, 8 ears
shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
606. Yellow-ear, from the current year's crop, 8 ears shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
607. Yellow-shelled, from the previous year's crop, 0.5 gallons
in a container, and labeled to show variety
and yield.

WHITE CORN:.

608. White-ear, from the previous year's crop, 8 ears shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
609. White-ear, from the current year's crop, 8 ears shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
610. White-shelled, from the previous year's crop, 0.5 gallons
in a container, and labeled to show variety and yield.

POPCORN:

611. White Popcorn-ear, from the previous year's crop,8 ears
shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
612. Red Popcorn-ear, from the previous year's crop, 8 ears
shucked and labeled with variety and yield.
613. Yellow Popcorn-ear, from the previous year's crop, 8 ears
shucked and labeled with variety and yield.

FIELD SOYBEANS (Oil):

614. Soybeans from the current year's crop, three stalks tied
together below leaves, with roots intact, but free of soil, and
labeled to show variety.
615. Soybeans from the previous year's crop. 1-gallon
zip lock bag, and labeled to show variety and yield.

GRAIN SORGHUM (Milo):

617. Grain Sorghum from the current year's crop, three stalks
tied together below leaves, with roots intact, but free of soil,
and labeled to show variety.
618. Grain Sorghum from the previous year's crop, 1-
gallon zip lock bag and labeled to show variety and
yield.

SWEET SORGHUM

619. Sweet sorghum from the current year's crop, three stalks
tied together below leaves, with roots intact, but free of soil,
and labeled to show variety.

WHEAT (Soft, Red, Winter)

620. Wheat from the current year's crop, 0.5 gallons in a container,
and labeled to show variety and yield.
621. Barley from the current year's crop, 0.5 gallons in a container,
and labeled to show variety and yield
DIVISION 6025 -WOOD SCIENCE

674. Level I made from a kit: Simple items which have precut
and pre-drilled parts and youth demonstrate knowledge of
assembly, selection and use of fasteners (nails, screws and/or
glue), sanding techniques, and appropriate finishes. Examples
could include a small birdhouse, non-hopper bird feeder,
etc. Item must demonstrate skill with fasteners, sanding and
appropriate finish (no puzzles).
675. Level 1, NOT from a kit - Simple constructed wood item
showing knowledge of hand tools, wood selection, cutting,
drilling, use of fasteners (nails, screws and/or glue), sanding
techniques, and appropriate finishes, (Examples could include
but not limited to napkin holder, letter holder, simple
picture frame, wire wiggly, towel holder, serving tray, jewelry
box, small flag holder, 4-H bookends, airplane, hurricane
lamp, trivet (pot holder), etc.)
676. Level 2, made from kit -More elaborate items which require
proper cutting, drilling, and youth demonstrate knowledge
of selection and skill in the use of fasteners (nails, screws
and/or glue), sanding techniques, and appropriate finishes
(Examples could include but not limited to the jewelry box, tool
tray, large birdhouse, pinewood cars, etc.) Items must
demonstrate skill with fasteners, sanding and appropriate finish
(no puzzles).
677 – Level 2, NOT from a kit - More elaborate items that
demonstrate mastered skills with hand tools, basic knowledge
of power hand tools, fastening options, appropriate surface
preparations, and finish applications, (Examples could
include but not limited to puzzle, footstool, revolving tie
rack, 4-H key holder, cutting board, book rack, serving a dish
shelf, sawhorse, hopper type bird feeder, etc.)
678. Level 3, not from a kit - Items showing a more advanced
knowledge of power tools, expertise in cutting, fitting,
surface preparation, attention to fastening details, and
finish application, (Examples could include but not limited
to: a multi-purpose box, corner shelf, bookshelf or laminated
wood projects, garden bench, planting box, nail and toolbox,
shop tool rack & shelf, etc.) Original designs are welcomed.
This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the item and 2)
a folder containing photographic documentation of the steps
taken in order to complete this exhibit.
679. Level 4, no kits - Level 4, Exhibits with a "furniture"
quality finish, showing an understanding of all woodworking
techniques learned in previous levels. Items must show a
mastery of joint construction and use of special woods, and
finishes. (Examples could include but not limited to checker
boardroom divider, coffee table, end table, chest of drawers,
gun rack or cabinet, etc.). Original designs are welcomed.
This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the item and 2)
a folder containing photographic documentation of the steps
taken in order to complete this exhibit.
680. Level 4, no kits Exhibits that do not require a fine finish
(painted finish allowable) because of practical use. Items
demonstrate knowledge of all woodworking techniques
learned in previous levels. Items must show a mastery of cutting,
drilling, joint construction, use of special woods, and appropriate
finishes. (Examples could include but not limited
to the porch swing, chaise lounge, picnic table, lawn chair, large
planters, etc.). This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1)
the item and 2) a folder containing photographic documentation
of the steps taken in order to complete this exhibit.
​​DIVISION 6021 - 4-H ELECTRIC

MAGIC OF ELECTRICITY

645. Battery-powered series and parallel circuits (Circuits
must include both series and parallel, a simple switch and can
be no more than 9 volts).
646. Homemade Galvanometer (Must be able to detect the
presence of an electrical current)
647. Electromagnetic Circuits (Must be a working electromagnet
with a simple switch and can be no more than 9 volts).
648. Simple homemade DC motor (Rotor must turn under its
own power).

INVESTIGATING ELECTRICITY

649. Battery-powered series or parallel circuit (Circuit may
be either series or parallel, must contain either a momentary
and/or three-way switch, a circuit diagram with explanation
and can be no more than 9 volts).
650. Original design soldered circuit project (Circuit must
contain an on/off switch, a motion or tilt activated a switch, a
light and sound-producing device and must be powered by 9
volts.
651. Display of wire sizes and types with description and example
of usage (display must contain at least 12 different examples)
652. Simple household or farm use circuit (circuit must contain one single pole switch controlling one electrical load device.
The circuit should be mounted on a sturdy mounting surface
and free standing. Wiring should be done with Romex
NM-B-12 gauge wire and clamped or stapled appropriately.
A circuit diagram with an explanation must be included.
653 Complex household or farm use circuit (Circuit must
contain at least two three-way switches, and may also contain
a four-way switch, controlling one electrical load device. The
circuit must also contain a working duplex electrical outlet.
The circuit should be mounted on a sturdy mounting surface and
free standing. Wiring should be done with Romex NM-B 12
gauge wire and clamped or stapled appropriately. A circuit
diagram with explanation must be included)
654 Table deck, vanity or floor lamp, any purpose
Original design only. Pop can lamp kits will be
disqualified.

ENTERING ELECTRONICS

655. Basic electronic circuits without solid-state components
(from project book).
656. Basic electronic circuits with solid-state components
(from the kit).
657. Basic electronic circuits with solid-state components
(original circuit design, must include a circuit diagram and explanation).

GREEN ENERGY


658. Wind or solar-powered energy project from the kit.
659. Wind or solar-powered energy project original design.
​DIVISION 6027 - 4-H FORESTRY

FIRST YEAR

703. Leaf Collections
Collection of 10 leaves representing 10 forest trees found in
Kentucky. Mounting instructions in the forestry book, “4-H
Forestry Project Unit I - IntroducingYourself to Trees” (4DF-
01PAor most recent version)Activity #1 is to be followed.
704. Leaf Print Collection
Collect and print 10 leaves representing 10 forest trees found
in Kentucky. Instructions in the forestry book, “4-H Forestry
Project Unit I - IntroducingYourself to Trees” (4DF-01PAor
most recent version) Activity #3 are to be followed.

SECOND YEAR

705. Leaf Collection-2nd year
Collection of 20 leaves representing 20 forest trees and different
from ones done by the same exhibitor in a first year project
found in Kentucky. Mounting instructions in the forestry
book, “4-H Forestry Project Unit I - Introducing Yourself to
Trees” (4DF-01PAor most recent version)Activity #1 are to
be followed.
706. Educational Exhibit
Develop a creative educational exhibit on some phase of
forestry. The exhibit may utilize any visual technique. The
the total exhibit is not to exceed dimensions of 2' x 2', or four (4)
square feet.

THIRD YEAR AND OVER

707. Educational Exhibit
Develop a creative educational exhibit on some phase of
forestry. The exhibit may utilize any visual technique.
The total is not to exceed dimensions of 3'x3', or nine (9)
square feet.
708. Stem, Leaf, Fruit display
Collect and mount 5 stems, leaves and fruit representing 5
forest trees found in Kentucky. Follow closely the instructions
in the forestry book, “4-H Forestry Project Unit I - Introducing
Yourself to Trees” (4DF-01PA or most recent
version) Activity #2 is to be followed, including the 2' x 3'
exact size.
Division 6030 –
4-H PHOTOGRAPHY


1. See General Rules applying to all 4-H exhibitors and general
rules applying to all 4-H exhibits other than livestock
listed previously in this catalog.
2. Specification for exhibits:
a. All general photography classes are taken from 4-H Photography
Core Curriculum (Focus on Photography, Controlling
the Image and Mastering Photography).
b. Each county may have one (1) entry per class in both general
photography and horticulture photography. Only one
entry per class per county.
c. General photography (levels 1, 2 & 3): 4-Hers can enter 3
classes at any one level (curriculum) per year.
d. Horticulture photography: a 4-H’er may enter any of the
classes in addition to general photography.
e. All pictures must be made since the last State Fair.
f. All classes (including Horticulture)

WITH ONE PHOTOGRAPH MUST
BE MOUNTED ON WHITE 10”x 16” MAT

BOARD-available via order entry (no poster board or foam
core board accepted). Single photographs are limited to up
to a maximum size of 8”x 12”. Pictures cannot be framed or
matted with a colored mat board.
g. All classes (including Horticulture) WITH MULTIPLE
PHOTOGRAPHS (More than 1 photograph) MUST BE
MOUNTED ONWHITE16” x 20” MAT BOARD (no poster
board or foam core board accepted). Pictures cannot be
framed or matted with a colored mat board.
h. Each picture must be mounted securely. Rubber cement or
dry mounting tissue is recommended. Do not use photo
mounting corners.
i. Entries must use the current identification tag securely
mounted to the front of the mat board in the lower right corner.
Note: The identification tag should NOT cover photo or hangover edge of the board.
j. If labels are required for pictures, it must be typed, on
white paper, and placed directly below the photograph it
is identifying.
k. Absolutely nothing in the front of mat board except photographs,
labels (if required) and ID tag. Any other required
materials are to be mounted on the back.
L. If an entry does not fit class descriptions, it will be given
a participation award.

3. Appropriate hangers for project work is any hardware permanently
attached to the project that can be displayed on a
the metal grid works walls via metal S hook, binder clip, or zip tie.
Matboard can be displayed utilizing binder clips while
stretched canvas can be displayed with S hooks.
4. Project entry must meet all requirements for the class; otherwise,
the entry will be disqualified.
5. Photography will be judged on, but not limited to: Technical,
impact, composition, creativity, presentation, and the
ability of the picture to tell a story.

Level 1 Focus on Photography

764 a. Fun with shadows, pg. 22 photography shadows to create
a mood or element of surprise. Display two photographs
of shadow shapes.
764 b. Fun with shadows, pg. 22 photography shadows to create
a mood or element of surprise. Display three photographs
that show how the shadow of a subject can “grow” or shrink
over time.
765. Directing the Light, pg. 26 Using either natural or artificial
light take photographs of the subject with either front lighting,
backlighting, side lighting, and top lighting (overhead).
766 a. What do you see? Pg. 34 Landscape with foreground,
middle grounds, and background labeled 1, 2, 3
766 b. What Do You See? Pg. 34 Landscape with a foreground
object that frames the photograph.
766.c What Do You See? Pg. 34 Portrait of a person without
the background clutter.
767 a. Bird’s eye view Pg 46 Display 1 photograph lying on
your stomach.
767 b. Bird’s Eye View Pg. 46 Display 1 photograph lying on
your back.
767 c. Bird’s Eye View Pg. 46 Display 1 photograph leaning
over
767 d. Bird’s Eye View Pg. 46 Display 1 photograph bending
sideways.
768 a. Hat Tricks and Magic, pg. 50 Hat trick: Have a plant
growing out of the subject.
768 b. Hat Tricks and magic, pg. 50 Hand Stand: Have it look
like someone is holding a person in their hand.
768 c. Hat Tricks and Magic, pg. 50 Set up the photograph to
look like a person is hanging from the ceiling.
768 d. Hat Tricks and Magic, pg. 50 Bad Hair Day: Position
a person to look like their hair is sticking straight up.
769. Photos Can Tell a Story, pg. 58 A sequence of 3-5 photographs
that tell a story. There should be a beginning, a middle
and an end.
770. Black and White pg. 62 Black and White photos that
show texture, shape, and composition. The interest is in contrast, light, and shadows.  

Level 2 Controlling the Image

771 a. Golden Photo, pg. 38 Display 1 photo showing the
Rule of Thirds.
771 b. Golden Photo, pg. 38 Display 1 photo using the Golden
Triangle.
771 c. Golden Photo, pg. 38 Display 1 photo using the Golden
Rectangle.
772. Space Tells a Story, pg. 46 Display 1 photo that
shows good use of positive and negative space.
773. Capture a Candid Photo, pg. 48 Create a candid collection
(3-5) photos. Take photographs at a party, parade, sporting
event or family reunion. Try to capture the emotions of
the event.
774 a. Freeze the moment, pg. 54 Display 1 using setting #1-
set the shutter speed 1/250 to freeze action for a clear photograph.
774 b. Freeze the moment, pg. 54 Display 1 using setting #2-
set the shutter speed at 1/30.
775 a. Panning the Action, pg. 58 Display 1 photo showing
the panning technique.
775 b. Panning the Action, pg. 58 Display 1 photo showing
blurring of motion.
776. Bits and Pieces, pg. 62 Display 1 photo. Fill the frame
with small parts of a whole subject. Choose bits and pieces
for close-ups.
777. Panoramas, pg. 66 Take a series of photos to create a
panorama. Display individual pictures on the mat board.

Level 2 Mastering Photography


778. Reflections, pg. 30 One picture of reflections as subjects.
779 a. Sill-Life, pg. 42 Display 1 photo that includes similar
themes. Arrange similar objects (food, goys, glassware)
against a neutral background.
779 b. Still-life, pg. 42 Display 1 photo that includes similar
colors. Arrange items of similar colors (brown eggs, a loaf of
bread, cutting board, and brown crackers).
780 a. Say “Cheese”, pg. 46 Display 1 formal portrait.
780 b. Say “Cheese”, pg. 46 Display 1 informal portrait.
781 a. Mastering Composition, pg. 50 Display 1 photo that
shows symmetry vs asymmetry.
781b. Mastering Composition, pg. 50 Display 1 photo that
shows pattern and texture.
781 c. Mastering Composition, pg. 50 Display 1 photo that
shows shape and form.
781 d. Mastering Composition, pg. 50 Display 1 photo that
shows visual rhythms.
782 a. Expression Through Color, pg. 54 Display 1 photo that
shows monochromatic color techniques.
782 b. Expression Through Color, pg. 54 Display 1 photo that
shows contrasting color techniques.
782 c. Expression Through color, pg. 54 Display 1
The photograph shows complementary color techniques.
783. Details! Details!, pg. 58 Display 3 to 5 examples that
highlight details in a subject you explored.
784. pictures with a Purpose, pg. 62 Display 2-3 photographs
that could be a part of a brochure. Include words that market
the product, event or the organization.
785. How Did They Get That Picture? Pg. 66 Display 35 photographs taken with advanced or specialized equipment.

Horticulture Photography


For the purposes of the Kentucky 4-H Horticulture Photography
the contest, only photographs representing OLERICULTURE
and FLORICULTURE will be accepted. Pomology
deals with fruit and nut crops and are NOT included in photography
classes. Landscape horticulture is a broad category
that includes plants for the landscape, including lawn turf but
particularly nursery crops such as shrubs, trees, and climbers
and are NOT included in photography classes.


786. Single black and white. Horticulture subject or activity.
(Maximum size: 8” x 12”)
787. Single color. Horticulture subject or activity. (Maximum
size: 8” x 12”)
788. The sequence of 4 photos. B & W or Color representing a
horticultural event or activity that tells a visual story, chronologically,
without the use of words.
789. Horticulture collection (B&Wor color), consisting of 6
photos.
​DIVISION 6028 – GEOLOGY

For each of the classes, specimens may consist of rocks, minerals,
and or fossils. There is a separate label for rocks, minerals,
and or fossils (three differ-ent labels).


715. First year geology - consisting of 15 different specimens.
716. Second year Geology - consisting of 25 different specimens
(up to 12 may be from previous project year) (no more
than 2 boxes)
717. Third Year Geology - consisting of 35 different specimens
(up to 17 may be from previous project year) (no more
than 2 boxes)
718. Fourth Year Geology - consisting of 50 different specimens
(up to 25 may be from previous project year) (no more
than 2 boxes)
719. Special collection for fifth year or more members - creative,
advanced display of member's choosing which depicts
a geological process, theme, story, or manufacturing process.

Posters, notebooks and written narratives may be included.
​Division 6026 – ECOLOGY, NATURAL

RESOURCES

687. A First-year project (Up to three 9” x 13”
official cardboard boxes, or up to two 18” x 24”
wooden boxes, with a minimum of 25 insects, maximum 50
insects, from at least four orders. Identification beyond order
not necessary. All specimens must have the date and locality
labels.)
687. B  First year project (minimum of 25 insect photographs,
maximum 50 photographs, from at least four orders.
Identification beyond order not necessary.
All photographs  must have a notation field.)

Specifications for insect photography exhibits:
a. Images will be submitted on a USB memory device (such
as a “thumb drive”) with no other data except for the images
and folders. The USB device must be identified externally
with a tag or label, showing “4-Her’s last name-County-Lot
Number-Class Number-Entry Number.” The single root
folder will be labeled with the same information. b. Each
image will be .jpg format, 1920X1080 pixels. Vertical or horizontal
black bars may be present to allow for cropped images.
c. Each image will have a filename that matches the following:
“last name-county-#.jpg,” where “#” indicates the number
of the image inside the folder. Example filename:
Doe-Fayette-1.jpg
d. Each image will include a 200X200 pixel, white notation
box with important information about the photo. This notation
field may be placed anywhere inside the image, including
inside black bars (if present). Fonts may vary based on
the 4-Her’s software, but we recommend Ariel, 10pt, black,
non-bold.

688. Second-year project (Up to three 9” x 13” official cardboard
boxes, or up to two 18” x 24” wooden boxes, with a minimum
of eight orders and not less than 50 insects, nor more
than 100 insects.) Half of the insects should be identified
with a common name.
689. Third-year project (Three 9” x 13” official cardboard
boxes, or two 18” x 24” wooden boxes, with a minimum of
10 orders and 100 insects, a maximum of 150 insects.)
690. Fourth-year project (Three 9” x 13” official cardboard
boxes, or two 18” x 24” wooden boxes, with a minimum of 12
orders and 150 insects, no maximum)An addition cardboard
or wooden box with an example of insect damage, the stage
of the insect causing the damage and any other stage of the
insect that helps identify the problem. Include information in
the display that tells how the insect is controlled. The life cycle
of two insects may be displayed if desired.
691. Fifth-year project (may be repeated for successive years
of eligibility but must be a different exhibit. No exhibit that
has been judged in any previous State Fair may be entered.)

Any type of display that pertains to experiences beyond those
of previous projects. Special collections of native and/or exotic
butterflies, beetles to some other insect order; a study in
depth of one insect or small group of insects: a display of insect
camouflage: a display of plastic embedded insects: a collection
of insect larvae and nymphs are examples.

Charts, photographs, models or any other visual aids may be used. 4-H'ers are encouraged to write a short (1 or 2 paragraphs)
statement developing the theme of their fifth-year display.


692. Two one-pound containers of white extracted honey.
693. Two one-pound containers of light amber extracted
honey.
694. Two one-pound containers of amber extracted honey.
695. Two one-pound containers of dark amber extracted
honey.
696. Two wide-mouth quart jars of chunk honey, any color.
697. Any frame of capped honey suitable for comb honey
(light)
698. Any frame of capped honey suitable for comb honey
(amber)
699. Any frame of capped honey suitable for extraction (light)
700. Any frame of capped honey suitable for extraction
(amber)
701. Best Display of one-frame observation hive of honey
bees consisting of worker bees, a properly marked queen an
a brood
​​​DIVISION 6041 – 4-H LEADERSHIP & COMMUNICATIONS PROJECT

COMMUNICATION PROJECT:

925. Junior Division: Resume—one page resume using Microsoft
Word. See the Kentucky 4-hWorkforce Preparation
and Career Readiness Curriculum
926. Senior Division: Resume—one page resume using Microsoft
Word. See the Kentucky 4-hWorkforce Preparation
and Career Readiness Curriculum

DIVISION 6041-B 4-H LEADERSHIP PROJECT

927 Junior Level: 2 pages based on an activity, or program or
project from the 4-H Leadership Curriculum or program.(
club, activity, project, event)
928 Senior Level: 4 pages based on an activity, or program or
project from the 4-H Leadership Curriculum or program.(
club, activity, project, event)

DIVISION 6041-C SECRETARY SCRAPBOOK

929 4-H Club Scrapbook—using pictures and captions tell
about your 4-H Clubs year focusing on leadership, communications
and community services activities.
(no limit on page numbers)

DIVISION 6042- Kentucky 4-H Trends

1010. Junior Clover Photograph.
1011. Senior Clover Photograph.
1040. Junior Historical Poster.
1041. Senior Historical Poster.

Upcycling Project

Upcycling is taking something that you are throwing away
and making it into something that maintains or improves the
quality of the materials. Example: There are coin purses
made from sweaters, earrings cut out of vinyl records and an
old travel case made into a clock. The designs will be judged
on quality, use, and creativity. Entries are limited to one entry
per class per county.

1050.  Junior Upcycling Project.
1051. Senior Upcycling Project.

Non Traditional Needlework

1074.  Junior loom knitting.
1075. Senior loom knitting.
1076.  Junior arm knitting.
1077. Senior arm knitting.

4-H MISCELLANEOUS

10. Cloverbud 4-H Exhibit - any youth under 4-H age
11. Jr.Miscellaneous - any 4-H projects which do not fit into
any other 4-H class
12. Sr. Miscellaneous - any 4-H projects which do not fit
into any other 4-H class
13. Club Exhibit - open to any 4-H club in Barren
County.
DIVISION 6032 – 4-H SEWING

Junior Division for 4-H’ers Ages 9-13

Junior members may complete the projects in any order and
may repeat a level for more than one year. The curriculum includes
instructions for making “practice” items; the practice
items do not fit in classes in the Clothing Division.


Unit I – Let’s Learn to Sew:
Beginner skills; See Publication:
pages 3-20 and 55-56.


790 A. Unit I Clothing Option: Shorts, pants, or
skirt with casing waistline (elastic and/or
drawstring). Garment must be made from woven
fabric and include the following: straight
machine stitching, appropriate visible seam
finish, and machine-stitched hem.
790 B. Unit1 Non-Clothing Option: Apron OR drawstring
backpack/shoulder bag OR tote bag with fabric handles OR
a laundry bag. Item must be made from woven fabric and include
the following: straight machine stitching, appropriate
visible seam finish and a casing or machine stitched hem.

Unit II – Let’s Get to the Bottom: Beginner skills; See Publication:
pages 21-38 and 55-56.


791. Unit II Clothing Option: Skirt, shorts or
pants. The exhibit must be made from woven fabric
and include the following: enclosed seams,
appropriate seam finish, interfacing, zipper, and
a facing or waistband.
792. Unit II Non Clothing Option: Zippered tote
bag, purse, garment bag, or duffle/gym bag. Exhibit
must be made from woven fabric and include the
following: enclosed seams, appropriate seam
finish, interfacing, and 14” or longer zipper.

Unit III – Top It Off: Beginner skills; See Publication: pages
39-52 and 55-56.


793. Unit III Clothing Option: Shirt, simple jacket, one-piece
dress in no waistline, cape with a hood or collar, bathrobe,
or vest with lining or facing. Garment must be made from
woven fabric and include the following: buttons and buttonholes.
A simple lining, trim, collar, and sleeves may be included
but are not required.
794. Unit III Non Clothing Option: Backpack with lining, applied
trim, and button/buttonhole closure.

Unit IV – StretchYour Knit Skills: Beginner skills; See Publication:
pages 45-48 and 55-56.


795. Unit IV Stretch Your Knit Skills: 1 or 2 pieces complete
outfit made from knit fabric; such as a dress, top, and bottom,
pajamas, or a nightshirt. All garment pieces must be made from
knit fabric with a limited amount of one- way stretch; rib knit
maybe included for the neckband and arm/leg band trim only.
Unit V –Moving on Up Intermediate skills; See publication
796. Unit V Moving on Up: one-piece complete outfit made
from woven fabric; such as a dress, coveralls, or jumpsuit.
Item must include at least a zipper and/or buttons and buttonholes.
A waistline simple lining, trim, collar, and sleeves may be included
but are not required.


Unit VI – Put it All Together; See Publication: pages 49-56.

797. Unit VI Put It All Together Clothing
Option: 2 or 3 pieces complete coordinating outfit; such as
warm-up suit; dress with jacket or coat, swimwear with
a cover-up, jacket or shirt with slacks/ skirt. At least one piece
must include sleeves and a collar/hood. No simple casings.

Fabric choice may be woven, knit or a combination of the
two.


798. Unit VI Put It All Together Non-Clothing
Option: Original design tote bag and documentation folder -
UsingWild Ginger Software, Inc.Wild Things! Software program,
select the Tote Bag option and design a bag that includes
at least 2 pockets. Be creative with your design.
Required elements: at least 2 pockets; minimum size of 12
inches in height and 12 inches in width. Item must have at least one functional zipper; and creative stitchery or applied trim to personalize your bag. Optional elements: lining, other type closure as design dictates [button(s), hook and loop tape, or snap(s)]. If
a bag is not lined, it is suggested that the seam allowances be
finished with a bound seam finish.
This class is for ages 9-13.
In the documentation include: your name, your county, the
name of the unit, class entered, number of years you have
been sewing, cost, and the printed design sheets (one for each
pocket selected) from the program, and answers to the following
questions:

1. How did you choose the size of your tote bag? Did you
use any of the default settings in the program?
2. Did you have any trouble using the software or printing
your pattern? Explain
3. Did you download theWild Things! Program to your home
computer or use the program at your county extension office?
4. Did you make any changes to your pattern after it was
printed? If so, tell what you changed.

Unit: UpCycle It!—for youth ages 9-13 with
advanced sewing skills.


799 A. UpCycle It! Junior—item sewn from recycled/repurposed
garments and documentation folder: Sew a garment or
fashion accessories from previously worn garments. Recycled
fabric is to be the major component of the item. Recycled
garments may be cast-offs from the member’s family/friends
or purchased at a yard sale or similar low-cost source. Documentation
is required. In documentation include the following:
your name, your county, the name of the unit, class
entered, number of years you have been sewing; a “before”
photo of all recycled items used; source of the recycled garment;
how the design was created; and any design drawings
that were used in the creation.
Place documentation in a folder or plastic sheet protector.
“Deconstructed” t-shirts which do not include sewing skills
do not fit this class. Items for the home do NOT fit this class.
Items that do not include sewing as a major means of reconstruction are not eligible for this class. 

This class is for ages 9-13 with sewing skills.
Unit: Style Engineers-for guys and girls 9-13


799 B. Smart Clothing: one soft circuit item created using conductive thread and hand sewing and/or machine sewing
skills. LEDs, and battery pack. May include items such as an
LED bracelet, an illuminating fashion applique, or an illuminating
garment constructed by the member.

Senior Division for 4-Hers, age 14-18

Senior members may complete the projects in any order and
may repeat a level of more than one year.
Unit: Let’s be Casual- for ages 14-18. (Ask you
county 4-H agent for a copy)


800. Let’s Be Casual--Clothing Option: 1 or 2 pieces complete
outfit made from knitting or woven fabric such as a dress, top
and bottom, simple pajamas, or robe.
801. Let’s be Casual-- Non-Clothing Option: 2 coordinating
fabric accessories from the following: apron, oven or BBQ
mitt, wallet, garment Bag, purse, backpack or duffel bag.
Unit: Dress it Up- for ages 14-18. Ask your county 4-H agent
for a copy or see publication:
802. Dress It Up--1 or 2 pieces complete outfit such as a dress,
suit, pantsuit, sport coat, and slacks. Fabric choice may be
woven, knit or a combination of the two.

Unit: Match it Up- for ages 14-18. (Ask your county 4-H
agent for a copy
.

803. Match It Up--Clothing Option: Choose at least one item
from each group to make a complete 3 or 4 piece coordinated
outfit:

• Shorts, pants, or skirt
• Top, blouse, or shirt
• Vest, jacket, or sweater


At least one piece is required to have regulation set-in sleeves.
Fabric choice may be woven, knit or a combination of the
two. An accessory item may be included as the fourth piece.

This class is for ages 14-18.

804. Match It Up-- Non-Clothing Option: 3 or 4 pieces coordinating
sport/luggage/travel or fashion accessories set. Ideas
include, but are not limited to, a wallet, purse, device carrier,
backpack, duffel bag, gym bag or bag for bike or vehicle.
Among the items chosen, the set must include the use of applied
trim, pockets and at least one 14-inch or longer zipper.

Unit: Creative Expressions- for ages 14-18. (Ask your county
4-H agent for a copy


805. Creative Expression--Clothing Option: Construct a complete
outfit for one of the following activities:

• Halloween, theater, or historic costume
• Uniform for medical, cheerleader, dancer, etc.
• Riding apparel


806 Creative Expression-- Non-Clothing Option: Select one
of the following and construct a:

• Fabric doll or animal with a wardrobe of two outfits
• Machine appliquéd specialty flag or decorative banner
(minimum size 24 inches x 24 inches)

This class is for ages 14-18.

807. Leisure Time--Clothing Option: 2 or 3 pieces complete
outfit. Choose from the following:

• Athletic wear such as leotard, cycling wear, warm-up suit,
bathing suit and cover-up, tennis wear
• Pajamas and robe (must use specialty fabric such as terry
cloth, flannel, fleece, nylon tricot)
• Raincoat and hat or rain suit This class is for ages 14-18.
Unit: Formal Affair- for youth ages 14-18 with advanced
skills. (Ask your county 4-H agent for a copy)
808 Formal Affair--1 or 2 pieces complete outfit, such as a
prom dress, bridesmaid dress, or tuxedo. Fabric choice may
be woven, knit or a combination of the two. This class is for
ages 14-18.

Unit: UpCycle It!—for youth ages 14-18 with advanced
sewing skills; 


809. Upcycle It! Senior—item sewn from recycled/repurposed
garments and documentation folder: Sew a garment or
fashion accessory from previously worn garments. Recycled
fabric is to be the major component of the item. Recycled
garments may be cast-offs from the member’s family/friends
or purchased at a yard sale or similar low-cost source. Additional
documentation is required. In documentation include
the following: your name, your county, the name of the unit,
class entered, number of years you have been sewing; a “before”
photo of all recycled items used; source of the recycled
garment; how the design was created; and any design drawings
that were used in the creation. Place documentation in a
folder or plastic sheet protector. “Deconstructed” t-shirts
which do not include sewing skills that do not fit this class. Items
for the home do NOT fit this class. Items that do not include
sewing as a major means of reconstruction are not eligible
for this class. See publication.

This class is for ages 14-18 with sewing skills.​
Unit: Style Engineers– for guys and girls 14-18


810. Smart Clothing: one soft circuit item created using conductive
thread and hand sewing and/or machine sewing
skills. LEDs, and battery pack. May include items such as an
LED bracelet, an illuminating fashion applique, or an illuminating
garment constructed by the member.​
DIVISION 6039 - 4-H HOME ENVIRONMENT

Unit I EXHIBITS from Exploring Your Home project book

887. Color Collage (pp. 7-8, activity 3): A collage of color
created by the member to depict colors liked by the member.
A collage is made up of a collection of objects (such as paper,
fabric, wrapping paper, wallpaper, carpet, or other materials)
artistically arranged and adhered to mat board or foam core
board.
888. Texture Collage (pp. 8-9, see activities 1 & 2): A collection
of textured items or rubbings of textured items artistically
arranged and adhered to the mat board or foam core board.
889. The transparent finish applied to the small wood objects (pp.
13-14): Apply a clear finish such as tung oil, penetrating the seal
or polyurethane which does not include stain to a small wood
an object such as a bowl, tray, cutting board, board game or box.

A transparent finish allows the wood grain to show through.
Judging emphasis will be on how well the object is prepared
for the finish and how well the finish has been applied, not
the construction of the wood object. The wood object may
be made by the member, made by someone else, purchased
or found. Items that are stained or finished with paint do not
fit in this class.

890. Simple cloth item for the home (Sewing machine may
be used but is not required): Examples: decorative pillow,
tablecloth, laundry bag, placemats; footstool with a seat
made of woven fabric; fabric applied to an item such as a
box, plate, or lampshade. Unacceptable: purses, tote bags,
backpacks, duffle bags.
891. Wastebasket (pp. 10-12) decorated by member
892. Bulletin board (If it is to be hung on a wall, it must be
ready to hang with appropriate hardware attached.)

Unit II EXHIBITS from Living with Others project book

893. The decorative item for the home&photo: decorative item
created by the member as part of a 4-H Home Environment
Project. Include a photo showing how the item fits into the
home’s décor.
894. Simple wood item refinished by the 4-H member (pp.
14-15): Item should have straight lines with no elaborate
carvings or turnings. (The idea is to learn how to apply a new
finish such as paint, stain, varnish, polyurethane, etc. to a
simple wooden furnishing that’s already in use.) Documentation
is a “before” photo with an explanation of how the item
was refinished must be securely attached. Examples: refinished
footstool, children's furniture, small box, tray, picture
frame, bookshelves, and plant stand.
895. Cloth item for the home created using a sewing machine
(Unit II, p. 12-14): Examples: hemmed tablecloth or
table runner, wall hanging, pillow, pillowcase, throw, embellished
towels, shower curtain, chair cover, laundry bag,
pet bed, valence, and curtains. Unacceptable: purses, tote
bags, backpacks,

896. Invitation and thank you letter/note: Design an invitation
and thank you letter/note for a sleepover, birthday party
or other occasions of your choice. (p. 6-7) Cards/letters may
be created with computer software or handwritten. Decorations
on the cards/letters may be member’s original artwork,
computer-generated art, purchased or found decorative
items. The message is written in the card or is more important
than the decorations. Write your name and county on the back
of each card/letter and place each card/letter in a plastic sheet
protector. (For the fair, it is best to use a fictitious address
and contact information on the invitation or thank you.) Envelopes
are not required for the exhibit.

Unit III EXHIBITS from Where I Live project book.

897. Accessory for the home created by the 4-H member:
This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the accessory
and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation. Documentation is
to include: a sketch or photo to show how the accessory is
used in the home and a description of how the design and
colors fit in with the other furnishings and color used in the
home. Examples: stitchery or appliqué wall hanging, latch
hook items, pillow with applied design (stitchery, appliqué
or other media), rug, picture in an appropriate frame and ready
to hang.

898. Individual place (table) setting: This exhibit is to be
made up of two parts: 1) one individual place setting appropriate
to a theme or event was chosen by the 4-H member and 2)
a color photo or diagram of the place setting showing how it
should be arranged. (pp. 11-13) Include plate, beverage container(
s), placemat, and napkin.Additional decorative item(s)
are optional. All items that make up the place setting are to
fit on the surface of the placemat. Flatware (knife, fork and
spoon) must be included in the photo/diagram showing how
all the items are arranged, but do NOT send flatware to the
state fair. To ensure that all pieces get returned to the member,
write the name and county of the exhibitor on tape and place
every part of the table setting in a location hidden to the public
when exhibited at the fair.

899. Piece of furniture refinished (stripped, sanded, and
painted or stained/sealed) by the 4-H member (pp. 16-20):
This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) the furniture and
2) Documentation is to include a “before” photo with an explanation
of how the item was refinished must be securely attached.
Examples: rocker, table, chair or chest.

900. Old or discarded item made useful in a new way as a
home accessory (p. 20): This exhibit is to be made up of two
parts: 1) the accessory and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.
Documentation is to include a “before” photo; an explanation
of how the item was made useful again in a new
way; materials used, cost and time involved in the project. Examples:
old silverware flattened and made into wind chimes;
scrap wood pieces made into wall art; old lace doily attached
to a pillow or framed; old toolbox cleaned up and made into
a TV stand.

Unit IV EXHIBITS from In My Home project book

901. An accessory for the homemade with member’s
original or adapted design: This exhibit is to be made up of
two parts: 1) the accessory and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation.
Documentation is to include an explanation of
how the item was created/adapted and a description of how
and where an item is used in the home. Examples: latch hooked
rug or wall hanging; pillow with stitchery design; wall natural
dyed yarns, or drawing with mat and finished or refinished
frame.
902. Heritage item refinished, restored, or made by the 4-
H member: This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1)
the item and 2) a sheet or folder of documentation. Documentation
is to include information on the history or meaning
of the item to the member, how the item was refinished,
restored, or made by the member, and how it is used in the
home. Examples include antique or collectible furniture,
memory box, a scrapbook that reflects the family of several generations),
quilt with heritage design, wall hanging showing
family tree.

903. Purchased article selected by 4-H member to solve a
home decorating problem: This exhibit is to be made up of
two parts: 1) the purchased article and 2) a folder of documentation.
Documentation is to include a description of the
problem to be solved, alternatives considered in the solution
of the problem, how the plan was carried out, resources used
(time, money) and member's evaluation of the results (satisfaction
with a purchased article, how an article is used in the
home), and photos illustrating the before and after effect. Examples
include wall decoration, lamp, vase, storage item,
desk accessories, bedspread, rug, table linens, pillow, and
draperies.

904. A cloth article made by the 4-H'er showing a major
home improvement: This exhibit is to be made up of two
parts: 1) the cloth article and 2) a folder of documentation.
Documentation is to include a written description, “before”
and “after” pictures /showing how cloth article is used in
the home, other colors used in a room, time and costs involved,
and care required. Examples: bedspread, quilt, window treatment
bench pad. Unacceptable: purses, tote bags, backpacks,
duffle bags.

Unit Advanced: Self-Directed Project--

The intent of the following
classes are to give members an opportunity to put
everything they have learned in Units I-IV of the home environment
projects into practice.


905. Furniture Experience: Furniture which has been refinished,
reupholstered, recovered, recycled, reused or remodeled
- The exhibit is to be made up of two pieces: 1) the piece of
furniture and 2) a folder describing the original condition of
the furniture (include a picture if possible), work required in
completing the project, time and cost involved, and how an item is
used in the home. DO NOT INCLUDE NEWLY CONSTRUCTED
FURNITURE.


906. Design Experience: Create a plan for or actually complete
a design experience. The exhibit is to be made up of
two pieces: 1) a home furnishing item which is representative
of the design experience (item may be made by the member
or purchased) and 2) a folder or notebook describing the plan.
Examples of project ideas: a plan for redecorating a room;
creation of an accessory item using an original design of 4-
H member; notebook with pictures and descriptions of architectural
styles used in Kentucky homes.

907. Heritage Experience: Complete a heritage project. The
the exhibit is to be made up of two pieces: 1) an item representative
of the heritage experience and 2) a folder or notebook
describing the overall experience, the significance of the project
to your family. Examples of project ideas: Restoration of
a family heirloom (could include caning, reseating, etc.) including
who it belonged to and the significance to the family;
study of furniture styles including pictures and history;
study of old buildings in the community including photos and
descriptions of the architectural significance, period of history,
uses of the buildings; create an item after learning a heritage
or craft skill...especially from an older family member
or friend and describe how the skill was learned, how interest
was stimulated and how you will use items and skills.
908 Major Home Improvement Experience: Complete a
major home improvement project. The exhibit is to be made
up of a notebook which describes the project, tell whether
the project was an individual project or a group or family project,
describe the do-it-yourself skills learned time and cost
involved. Include before, during, and after photographs, if
possible. Examples: improve storage areas in the house or
garage; paint the house; wallpaper and decorate a room; remodel
the basement.

CHANGING SPACES:

909. Room Floor Plan: This exhibit is to be made up of two
parts: 1) amounted printout of a room and 2) folder of the
documentation described below. Use the Better Homes and
Gardens web site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/
or similar software to draw a room (scale: 1 square = 1 foot).
Include a door(s), window(s), and furniture. Print in color or
black and white (Minimum size 8 ½ x 11 inches. Maximum
size 11 x 17 inches).Mount the printout on mat board or foam
core board. Documentation should include answers to these
questions: 1. Is the room you have drawn similar to a room
in your house? What are its dimensions? How many square
feet are in the room? 2. Did you have problems with the web
site or software? If so, how did you solve them? 3. Tell about
how you worked with the items in your room such as walls,
windows, doors, and furniture.

910. House Floor Plan: This exhibit is to be made up of two
parts: 1) mounted printout of house plan and 2) folder of the
documentation described below. Use any software program
to draw a house plan. Include
bedroom(s), bath(s), living space, kitchen, door(s) and window(
s). Including a garage is optional. Print in color or black
and white (Minimum size 8 ½ x 11 inches. Maximum size
11 x 17 inches.). Mount the printout on mat board or foam
core board. Documentation should include answers to these
questions: 1. Does your floor plan resemble the house you
live in? If not, did you look at other floor plans for inspiration?
What type of roof does your house have? 2. Did you
consider how a family member who is disabled (for instance,
a wheelchair user) might get around in your home? 3. Describe
any problems you had with the software and how you
solved them. Tell how you worked with additional items required
to create a floor plan.

911. Presentation Board – Color Scheme for One Room:
This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a presentation
board as described below and 2) a folder of the documentation
described below. Create a presentation board that illustrates
a color scheme for any room in the home. On mat
board or foam board, mount color pictures or actual swatches
of fabric, wall coverings, paint, and flooring, (Color pictures
may be downloaded and printed or cut from magazines to
represent these items. The mounting board should be 15” or
16” X 20” inches. In the folder, describe the person who lives
in the room and the decisions required in selecting the color
scheme

912. Presentation Board – Floor Plan & Color Scheme for
Bedroom: This exhibit is to be made up of two parts: 1) a
presentation board as described below and 2) a folder of the
the documentation described below. Create a presentation board
which includes a floor plan (with the placement of furniture)
and color scheme for a bedroom. Use the Better Homes and
Gardens web site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/
or similar software to draw the bedroom (scale: 1 square = 1
foot). Include a door(s), window(s), and furniture. Print in
color or black and white. On mat or foam board, mount the
floor plan and color pictures or actual swatches of fabric, wall
covering, paint, and flooring. (Color pictures may be downloaded
and printed or cut from magazines to represent these
items.) The mounting board should be 15” or 16” X 20.” In
the folder, describe the person who lives in the room and the
decisions required in selecting the color scheme, flooring,
wall, and window treatments; describe the furniture and how
the furniture was arranged to accommodate traffic flow; describe
the floor, wall, and window treatments selected, etc.;
and describe what you like most about the room.

913. Presentation Board – Floor Plan & Color Scheme for
Great Room or Family Room: This exhibit is to be made up
of two parts: 1) a presentation board as described below and
2) a folder of the documentation described below. Create a
presentation board that includes a room floor plan (with
the placement of furniture) and color scheme for a great
room/family room. Use the Better Homes and Gardens web
site www.bhg.com/decorating/arrange-a-room/ or similar
software to draw the room (scale: 1 square = 1 foot). Include
a door(s), window(s), and furniture. Print in color or black
and white. On mat or foam board, mount the floor plan and
color pictures or actual swatches of fabric, wall covering paint, and flooring. (Color pictures may be downloaded and
printed or cut from magazines to represent these items.) The
mounting board should be 15” or 16” X 20.” In the folder,
describe the family who uses the room and the decisions required
in selecting the color scheme, flooring, wall, and window
treatments; describe the furniture and how the furniture
was arranged to accommodate traffic flow; describe the floor,
wall, and window treatments selected, etc.; and describe what
you like most about the room.

DIVISION 6033 - 4-H Needlework

CROCHET Category

813 A.  Item(s) made of medium weight yarn: Must include
rows of single, half double and/or double or crochet stitches.
Such as scarf, purse, belt, hat, pillow, two wash cloths (made
from cotton yarn), or pair or slippers. Scarf must be at least
24” long.
813 B.  Large Crochet Item(s) made of medium weight yarn:
must include rows of single, half double and/or
814. Item made with novely yarn & single and/or double crochet
stitches. Afghan, shaw, vest.
815. Item(s) made of granny squares.
816 A. Crocheted item(s) made using intermediate skills/pattern
crochet stitches: Such as: hat, belt, scarf, pair of mittens,
pillow, sweater, vest, shawl or baby blanket, doily (made
from bedspread weight thread) or set of 5 different ornaments
(made from bedspread weight thread using intermediate
skills/stitches. Include one or more pattern stitches—shell,
arch, diamond, boble, snapdragon, popcorn, cross, puff, cluster, or seed/granite. Can include one or more colors in alternating rows (stripes).
816 B. Crochet item using intermediate skills for shaping and
fitting multiple pieces together: items must include increase
and decrease. Such stuffed toys or pair of slippers.
817. Item or pair of items using advanced crochet skills: include
one or more of the following advanced skills: afghan
stitch, beadwork, camel crochet, filet crochet, Irish crochet, Croknit/ hook, Cro-tat, hairpin lace, or broomstick lace; combining
pattern stitches with crocheted buttons and/or buttonholes;
creating plaids, geometric designs or checks;

making novelty crochet articles; or creating your own design.
Original designs must include a copy of directions, notes and
diagrams used to create the items(s). Suggested items include:
multi-colored hat, purse, collar (made with bedspreadweight
cotton thread), sweater, jacket, afghan or coat.


HAND EMBROIDERY Category

All embroidery projects are to be a “finished” item (for example:
the stitchery is framed or made into an item such as
a pillow, wall hanging, pot holder, eye-glass holder, etc.) The
stitchery can be created on a purchased item,
such as a pillowcase,
clothing, tote bag, purse, bib, or dishtowel. Items
may be made from purchased kits that meet the individual
project guidelines.


The sizes mentioned in the classes below (such as 5” X 7”)
relate to the amount of stitching, not the size of the fabric,
frame, or finished item.

818 A. Redwork: Embroidery item made with a single color of
floss such as “redwork” using red floss. Must use the stem
stich and have an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches
or larger.
818 B. Stamped Cross Stitch: Cross stitched design stamped
(printed/drawn) on plain woven fabric and have an embroidered
area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches or 2” x 16” border or
larger.
819 A. Candlewicking: Candlewicking design stamped on
plain woven fabric. Must include stem/outline, satin and
colonial not stitches and have an embroidered area equivalent
to 5 x 7 inches or larger.
819 B. Stamped Embroidery: Embroidery design
printed/drawn on plain woven fabric or felt. Must include
three or more of the following different stitches (stem/outline,
lazy daisy, running, straight, French knot, satin, blanket,
chain, or back stitch). May use more than one color of
floss. Must have an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7
inches or larger.
819 .C Free Embroidery: Embroidery design used to embellish
a base fabric without the design being drawn on the fabric.
Must include three or more of the following different stitches
(stem/outline, lazy daisy, running, straight, French knot,
satin, blanket, chain, or back stitch). May use more than one
color of floss. Must have an embroidered area equivalent to
5 x 7 inches or larger. Embroidery may embellish design lines
on the item.

820 A. Cross Stitch on Gingham: Cross stitch on ¼-inch gingham
and have an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches
or larger.
820 B. Counted Cross Stitch: Counted cross stitch on 11 count
Aida cloth and have an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7
inches or larger.
820 C. Chicken Scratch (on gingham): Chicken Scratch (also
known as Snowflake embroidery) on ¼ inch or smaller
checked gingham fabric. Must have an embroidered area
equivalent to 5 x 7 inches or larger.
821. Crewel Embroidery: Crewel embroidery design on linen
or cotton twill fabric using crewel or Persian yarn.Must have
an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches or larger.
822 A.  Counted Cross Stitch on 14 Count Aida Cloth: Must
have an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches or larger.
822 B. Counted Cross Stitch using Waste Canvas: Must have
an embroidered area equivalent to 5 x 7 inches or larger.
822 C. Huck Embroidery: Huck embroidery on huck
towel/toweling creating a minimum 2 inch wide border design.
822 D. Swedish Weaving: Swedish weaving on monk’s cloth
creating a minimum of inch wide border design.
823 A. Ribbon Embroidery Using Silk Ribbon for 5 or more
Embroidery stitches: Design may also include use of embroidery
floss in addition to silk ribbon.
823 B. Crazy Quilt Patchwork: Constructed of irregularly
shaped fabric pieces embellished with a combin-ation of ribbon
work, specialty thread, embroidery stitches, and/or beadwork
creating a finished crazy quilt design.
823 C. Counted Cross Stitch on 18 or 22 County EvenWeave
or Aida Cloth: Must have an embroidered area equivalent to
5 x 7 inchers or larger.
823 D. English Smocking: Smocked area must be equivalent
to 4 x 6 inches or larger. Design must include at least 5 different
smocking/embroidery stitches.

KNITTING Category

The objective is for youth to learn the skills involved in hand
knitting with needles. Therefore items made on a knitting
loom or knitting machine are NOT to be entered and will not
be judged.


824. Small/simple knitted item(s): Items such as a hat, pillow,
purse, scarf, belt, doll afghan, or two wash cloths using
worsted weight yarn. Solid color or variegated yarn is acceptable.
Wash cloths should be made from worsted weight
cotton yarn. Items are limited to those that include garter
stitch, stockinette stitch,
and/or ribbing stitch. Scarf must be at least 24 inches long.
Items made on a knitting machine or looms do not fit in this
class.
825. Knitted Item created with Novelty/Decorative Yarn(s):
Do not use standard medium weight yarn. Such as a purse,
scarf, hat, leg warmers, etc. Scarf must be at least 24” long.
Items made on a knitting machine or looms do no fit in this
class.
826. Larger/simple knitted item(s): Items such as
pair of mittens; pair of slippers, shawl; or afghan (minimum
size equivalent to 36” x 36”). May use yarn other than
worsted weight yarn. Two colors and one pattern stitch may
be used in addition to garter stitch, stockinette stitch, and/or
ribbing stitch. Items
made on a knitting machine or looms do not fit
in this class.
827 A. Knitted project focused on Shape—Garment of
Fashion accessory: Exhibit one item or a pair of items using
pick up stitches and/or knitting in the round. Item must include
increase or decrease.May use yarns other than worsted
weight yarn. May include simple color changes (stripes or
duplicate stitch). Ideas such gloves, hat, mittens, socks, leggings,
skirt, sweater, or vest. Items made on a knitting machine
or looms do not fit into this class.
827 B. Knitted project focused on Shape—Stuffed Toy: Exhibit
one item using pick up stitches and/or knitting in the
round. Item must include increase or decrease.May use yarns
other than worsted weight yarn. May include simple color
changes (stripes or duplicate stitch). Items mad on a knitting
machine or looms do not fit into this class.
828. Knitted project focused on Color Design: Exhibit one
item or a pair of items using charted designs or design your
own. Charted designs may include color changes such as Fair
Isle Intarsia, and Mosaic knitting. Original designs must include
a copy of directions, notes, and any diagrams used to
create the item. Ideas such as: pillow, afghan (minimum size
45-x 60-inches), holiday stocking (minimum 18-inches in
length), purse, pair of socks, sweater. Items made on a knitting
machine or looms do not fit in this class.
829 Knitted project focused on Textural Design: Exhibit one
item or pair of items using charted designs or design your
own. Charted designs must include multiple pattern stitches
such asAran Isle knitting or lace knitting. Knitting with beads
is also acceptable. Original designs must include a copy of directions,
notes, and any diagrams used to create the item.
Ideas such as:

cell phone holder, amulet, pillow, afghan (minimum size 45-
x 60-inches), holiday stocking (minimum 18-inches in
length), purse, pair of socks, sweater. Items made on a knitting
machine or looms do not fit in this class.


LACEWORK – TATTING Category

830. One thread tatting: Tatted item or item embellished with
tatted edging or tatted motifs using a tatting needle or shuttle
and single thread. Item should include rings with picots
and double stitches only. Item to which the tatting is attached
may be purchased, made by member or by someone else.
Judging is based on tatting and quality of workmanship in attaching it to the item.

831. Two thread tatting: Bookmark, jewelry, tatted embellishment
on clothing or other item using size 5 needle or shuttle
and 2 appropriate sized threads. Item must include chains
and rings with picots and double stitches, may use one or two colors of thread. Item to which the tatting is attached may be
purchased, made by member or by someone else. Judging is
based on tatting and quality of workmanship in attaching it to the
item.
832. Advanced Tatting: Exhibit one of the following items:
• Item of shuttle tatting using size 20 or 30 tatting thread. Options:
Bookmark, jewelry, embellishment on clothing or other
item. Item must include chains and rings with picots and double
stitches, may use one or two colors of thread.

• Item of needle tatting using size 7 needle and appropriate
sized tatting thread. Options: Bookmark, jewelry, embellishment
on clothing or other item. Item must include chains and
rings with picots and double stitches, may use one or two colors
of thread.

• Item using either shuttle or needle tatting with the use of
two threads and beads. Options: jewelry, advanced motif as
embellishment on clothing or other item.
Item to which the tatting is attached may be purchased, made
by member or by someone else. Judging is based on tatting
and quality of workmanship in attaching it to the item.

QUILTING Category

All projects are to be a completed item that includes a pieced
top, batting, backing fabric, and a finished outer edge. Quilting
on long arm quilting machines or hooped embroidery machines
is not an option for the Needlework-Quilting project.
Quilting or tacking should be done by hand or with the use
of a conven-tional sewing machine. Refer to 4-H Quilting
publications.


833. Quilted Mat (12” x 12” finished size)
Exhibit a 2 x 2 “quilt” made with four six-inch squares. At
least two of the 6-inch squares must be patchwork designs in
which square and/or rectangle pieces are pieced together (do
not include triangle pieces)

Piecing technique: stitch by hand or sewing machine Quilting
technique: machine tack or hand tie, stitch by hand or use
a conventional sewing machine (Do NOT use a long arm
quilting machine or hooped embroidery machine.)

834. Quilted Runner—machine tacked or hand tied (12” x 36”
finished size)
Exhibit a 1 x 3 four-block runner “quilt”.
Each four-block must include at least two 6-inch square
patchwork blocks made with square and/or rectangle pieces
(do not include triangle pieces).
Piecing technique: stitch by hand or sewing machine
Quilting technique: machine tack or hand tie.
835. Quilted Runner—quilted by hand or sewing machine
(12” x 36” finished size)
Exhibit a 1 x 3 four-block runner “quilt”.
Each four-block must include at least two 6-inch square
patchwork blocks made with square and/or rectangle pieces
(do not include triangle pieces).
Piecing technique: stitch by hand or sewing machine
Quilting technique: stitch by hand or use a conventional
sewing machine (Do NOT use a long arm quilting machine
or hooped embroidery machine.)
836. Hand QuiltedWall Hanging or Small Quilt (36” x 36”)
Exhibit a 4 or 9 block quilt or quilted wall hanging. Each
block must measure 12 inches by 12 inches for the 4-block
version or 9 inches by 9 inches for the 9-block version. Finished
project must include appliqué and/or triangle pieces
with sashing and/or borders. Finished quilt not to exceed 36
inches by 36 inches.

Piecing technique: stitch by hand or sewing machine
Quilting technique: stitch by hand using cross hatching,
stitching in the ditch, or echo/outline quilting.
Edge finishing technique:Applied binding with mitered corners,
hanging sleeve optional.


837. Machine Quilted Wall Hanging or Small Quilt (36” x
36”)
Exhibit a 4 or 9 block quilt or quilted wall hanging. Each
block must measure 12 inches by 12 inches for the 4-block
version or 9 inches by 9 inches for the 9-block version. Finished
project must include appliqué and/or triangle pieces
with sashing and/or borders. Finished quilt not to exceed 36
inches by 36 inches.

Piecing technique: stitched by hand or sewing machine
Quilting technique: stitch using a conventional sewing machine
using cross hatching, stitching in the ditch, or echo/outline
quilting. (Do NOT use a long arm quilting machine or
hooped embroidery machine.)

Edge finishing technique: Applied binding with
mitered corners, hanging sleeve optional.

838. Creative Quilt or Quilted Wall Hanging (at least 24” x
24” up to 48” x 48”)

Exhibit a creative quilt, minimum finished size 24 inches by
24 inches, maximum size 48 inches by 48 inches. Quilt top
should include advanced piecing techniques joined by hand
and/or machine that may include dimensional pieces, appliqué,
foundation piecing, English paper piecing, miniature
scale, and/or landscape design.

Piecing technique: stitch by hand or sewing machine
Quilting technique: Stitch by hand or conventional sewing
machine using stippling or patterned/stenciled motifs. (Do
NOT use a long arm quilting machine or hooped embroidery
machine.) Edge finishing tech-nique: Applied binding with
mitered corners, hanging sleeve optional.

​4-H DIVISION 6040 - CONSUMER AND FINANCIAL EDUCATION

Level 1 (Grades 4-5): The Consumer in Me


914. Poster on “Bargain Shopping” –For grades 4-5; complete
a cost comparison chart for one product you and your family
use as outlined in the activities under “Bargain Shopping” on
pp. 20-21. Use 20” X 30” foam core board or Cardboard.
Write a narrative telling how the decision making process
was used to reach your final choice; include answers to the
questions in “Check This Out!” on p. 21. At the end of the narrative, list the sources of information used in researching the topic.
Make a poster on “comparison shopping.” Include name, age, and
county at top of narrative. The narrative can be handwritten
or a computer printout; single or double spaced; on plain
white or notebook paper--one to two pages, printed on front
side only. Place the narrative in a plastic sleeve.
Attach the sleeve to the back of the poster with tape or a
binder clip.


915. Poster on “What is the Best Buy?” – For grades 4-5;
complete a cost comparison chart for two products in three
different sizes as outlined in the activities on pp. 22-23. Use
20” X 30” foam core board or cardboard. Write a narrative
telling how the decision making process was used to reach
your final choice; include answers to the question in “Check
This Out!” on p. 23. At the end of the narrative, list the
sources of information used in researching the topic.Make a
poster on “checking prices”. Include name, age, and county
at top of narrative. The narrative can be handwritten or a
computer printout; single or double spaced; on plain white
or notebook paper--one to two pages, printed on front side
only. Place the narrative in a plastic sleeve.Attach the sleeve
to the back of the poster with tape or a binder clip.


Level 2 (Grades 6-8): Consumer Wise


916. Poster on “Media and the Marketplace” –
For grades 6-8; complete a commercial
comparison as outlined in the activities on pp. 18-19. Use 20”
X 30” foam core board or cardboard. Write a narrative of
your answers to the questions in “Check This Out!” on p. 19
and tell what conclusions you were able to draw from the experience. At the end of the narrative, list the sources of information you used in researching your topic. Make a poster
related to “advertising aimed at young people”—Include name, age,
and county at top of narrative. The narrative can be handwritten
or a computer printout; single or double spaced; on
plain white or notebook paper--one to two pages, written/printed on front side only. Place the narrative in a plastic sleeve. Attach the
sleeve to the back of the poster with tape or a binder clip.


917. Poster on “Decision! Decisions! Decide!


“—For grades 6-8; complete the 6-Step


Decision Making process on any item you wish to purchase
as outlined in the activities on pp. 12-13. Use 20” X 30” foam
core board or cardboard.Write a narrative of your answers to
the questions in “Check This Out!” on p. 13 and tell what
conclusions you were able to draw from the experience. At
the end of the narrative, list the sources of information you
used in researching your topic. Make a poster related to “the
consumer decision-making process”.


Include name, age, and county at top of narrative. The narrative
can be handwritten or a computer printout; single or double
spaced; on plain white or notebook paper--one to two
pages, printed on front side only. Place the narrative in a plastic
sleeve. Attach the sleeve to the back of the poster with
tape or a binder clip.


918. Poster on “How to Write a Wrong” –For grades 9-12;
write a complaint letter as outlined in the activities on

pp 22-23. Use 20” X 30” foam core board or cardboard. Write a
narrative of your answers to the questions in “Check This
Out!” on p. 23 and tell what conclusions you were able to
draw from the experience.At the end of the narrative, list the
sources of information you used in researching your topic.
Make a poster related to “resolving a consumer complaint”.
Include name, age, and county at top of narrative. The narrative
can be handwritten or a computer printout; single or double
spaced; on plain white or notebook paper--one to two
pages, printed on front side only. Place the narrative in a plastic
sleeve. Attach the sleeve to the back of the poster with
tape or a binder clip.


919. Poster on “I Own a Car or Does It Own
Me?”
–For grades 9-12; calculate and illustrate the costs of
owning a car as outlined in the activities on pp. 28-31. Use
20” X 30” foam core board or cardboard.Write a narrative of
your answers to the questions in “Check This Out!” on pp.
29-30 and tell what conclusions you were able to draw from
the experience.At the end of the narrative, list the sources of
information you used in researching your topic. Make a
poster related to “consumer decision- making in buying a
car.” Include name, age, and county at top of narrative. The
narrative can be handwritten or a computer printout; single or double spaced; on plain white or notebook paper--one to two pages, printed on front side only. Place the narrative in a plastic sleeve. Attach the sleeve to the back of the poster with tape or a binder clip.


920. Poster on “What Does Real Life Cost?” –For grades 9- 12; identify and illustrate the true costs of living on your own
as outlined in the activities on pp. 32-33. Use 20” X 30” foam
core board or cardboard.Write a narrative of your answers to
the questions in “Check This Out!” on p. 33 and tell what
conclusions you were able to draw from the experience. At
the end of the narrative, list the sources of information you
used in researching your topic. Make a poster related to “the
financial responsibilities of living on your own. Include
name, age, and county at top of narrative. The narrative can
be handwritten or a computer printout; single or double
spaced; on plain white or notebook paper--one to two pages,
printed on front side only. Place the narrative in a plastic
sleeve. Attach the sleeve to the back of the poster with tape
or a binder clip.

​4-H Cake Decorating

1. Entry consists of a decorated (Styrofoam) cake.
2. Styrofoam MUST be the base for the decorating.
Real cakes will NOT be accepted.
3. Judging is based on decoration only not taste.
4. Exhibit is not limited to a color or design.
5. Refrigeration will NOT be provided.
6. Exhibit must be limited in size to no taller than 24” and no
more than ½ sheet board.
7. Cakes may be returned, based on the condition at the end
of the fair.
8. 4-H identification cards must be attached to bottom right
hand corner of sheet board.

1060. Junior 4-H Cake Decorating (Cake must include the 4-
H Clover either in design or decoration)
1061. Senior 4-H Cake Decorating (Cake must include the 4-
H Clover either in design or decoration)
1062. Junior General Cake Decorating.
1063. Senior General Cake Decorating.

Cup Cakes

1. Entry consists of a decorated (Styrofoam) cake.
2. Styrofoam MUST be the base for the decorating. Real
cakes will NOT be accepted.
3. Judging is based on decoration only not taste. 4. Exhibit is
not limited to a color or design.
5. Refrigeration will NOT be provided.
6. Exhibit must be limited to two cupcakes.
7. Cakes may be returned based on condition at the end of
the fair.
8. 4-H identification cards must be attached to bottom right
hand corner of sheet board.

1070.  Junior 4-H Cup Cake Decorating.
1071.  Senior 4-H Cup Cake Decorating.
1072.  Junior General 4-H Cup Cake Decorating.
1073.  Senior General Cup Cake Decorating.
​DIVISION 6035 - 4-H FOOD EXHIBITS

Muffins

841 Three Oatmeal Muffins: Use recipe in 4-H
Cooking 101, p. 54.
Yield: 10-12 muffins

Ingredients
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup rolled oats, quick cooking or regular
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup oil
Equipment
Non-stick cooking spray
Large mixing bowl
Mixing spoon
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Small bowl and fork
Muffin pan
Wire rack
Hot pads

Order of Work
1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly coat the muffin
pan with non-stick cooking spray.
2. Measure flour, oats, sugar, baking powder, and salt into
the large bowl. Mix with a spoon.
3. Break the egg into the small bowl and beat it lightly with
the fork. Then stir in the vegetable oil and milk.
4. Add the egg mixture to the dry mixture in the large bowl.
5. With a large spoon, mix only about 25 times, just enough
to get the dry ingredients wet. The dough is supposed to be
lumpy. If you mix too much, your muffins will be tough.
6. Carefully spoon the batter into prepared muffin pan. Fill
each cup two-thirds full.
7. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Remove pan
from the oven with hot pads. Let muffins cool slightly; then
remove them from the pan and place them on a wire rack to
cool.

Three Cheese Muffins:

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 201, p. 49.
Yield:12muffins

Ingredients
2 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon powdered mustard
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 cup milk
1/4 cup oil
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
Equipment
Muffin pan
Baking cup liners, optional
Nonstick cooking spray
Flour sifter
Mixing bowls, large and small
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
Mixing spoon
Rubber scraper

Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly coat muffin pan
with nonstick cooking spray or place a baking liner in each
muffin cup.
2. Place flour sifter in mixing bowl. Measure flour and pour
into sifter.Add baking powder, sugar, salt, mustard, and garlic
powder to the flour in the sifter. Sift together into the mixing
bowl.
3. Combine slightly beaten egg, milk, and vegetable oil in
the small mixing bowl.
4.Add liquid ingredients to dry ingredients. Stir together until
dry ingredients are just moist, but the batter is still lumpy.
Stir in shredded cheese.
5. Fill muffin cups 1/2 full.
6. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Best when
served slightly warm.

Biscuits

Three Rolled Biscuits: Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 201, p. 50.
Yield: 12 biscuits

Ingredients
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup butter or margarine, chilled
3/4 cup low-fat milk
Extra flour for kneading
Equipment
Flour sifter
Mixing bowl
Measuring cups, dry and liquid
Measuring spoons
Pastry blender or fork
Baking sheet
Biscuit or cookie cutter

Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.
2. Sift flour once and then measure it. Add to mixing bowl.
Add baking powder and salt. Stir.
3. Measure the fat and add to flour mixture. Cut the fat into
the flour mixture with the fork or pastry
blender until well mixed.
4.Make a hole in the center of the flour. Slowly add milk and
stir, using just enough to make dough soft but not sticky. Stir
just enough to wet the flour.
5. Sprinkle 3-4 tablespoons of flour on a clean, dry surface
and spread the flour with your hand. Turn dough onto the
floured surface. Knead dough a few times. To knead the
dough, rub some flour onto your hands. Use the heel of your
hand to push the dough away from you, and then fold it back
over itself. Give the dough a little turn, push and turn again.
Repeat 6-8 more times. Over-kneading the dough or adding
too much flour will make the biscuits tough.
6. Roll or pat dough to 3/4-inch thickness. Dip the biscuit
cutter into the flour. Use the biscuit cutter to cut the dough or
cut it into 2-inch squares with a knife. Place biscuits on ungreased
baking sheet about 2 inches apart. Gather the dough
scraps and reshape. Cut biscuits and add to baking sheet.
7. Bake about 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.

Three Scones:

raisins may be substituted for
dried cranberries. Yield: 16 wedges

Ingredients
3 cup self-rising flour
1 teaspoon orange peel, grated
1 cup dried cranberries (or substitute raisins for dried cranberries)
1/3 to ½ cup buttermilk
½ cup sugar
½ cup butter, softened
1 egg

Order of Work
1. In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, sugar and orange
peel. Mix well. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or fork
until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Gently stir in cranberries
(or raisins).
2. Place egg in a 1-cup measuring cup and beat well. In the
same measuring cup, add buttermilk to make 2/3 cup. Add
to flour mixture and stir gently until dry ingredients begin to
cling together; do not add more liquid.
3. Press dough gently together on a lightly floured surface to
form a ball. Divide dough in half. Place both halves on a
greased cookie sheet and flatten each into a 6-inch round. Cut
each into 8 wedges. Separate wedges slightly, to about ½ inch
apart.
4. Bake at 400°F for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.
Cool on cookie sheet 5 minutes before serving.

Quick Breads

845 Three Cornmeal Muffins: Use the recipe in
the 4-H Fair Recipe Book

Ingredients
1 egg, beaten
1 1/3 cups milk or 1 ¾ cup buttermilk
1/4 cup oil or melted shortening
2 cups self-rising cornmeal mix*

Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Spray a 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick
cooking spray.
2. In a small bowl, beat the egg slightly.
3. Measure the remaining ingredients and pour them into a
large mixing bowl.
4. Add the beaten egg to the large bowl.
5.Mix just enough to blend the ingredients but is still lumpy.
(If the batter is smooth, it has probably been mixed too
much.)
6. Fill the sprayed muffin cups two-thirds full of batter. Do
not use paper or foil liners.
7. Bake at 450°F for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.
*Be sure to read the front of the package to make sure that
you are using self-rising cornmeal mix. It is usually sold in a
bag similar to that in which flour is packaged. Self-rising
cornmeal mix has flour and leaven already added. (Boxed
corn muffin mix like that made by Jiffy is not the appropriate
product to use in this recipe.)

 Three pieces of Coffee Cake with Topping:

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 101, p. 59. Nuts are
optional.
Yield: 9-12 servings

Ingredients
Topping:
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1/2 cup chopped nuts (optional)
Coffeecake batter:
1 egg
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup milk
2 tablespoons melted fat or oil
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
Equipment
Non-stick cooking spray
Flour sifter
Waxed paper
Measuring cups
Spatula or knife
Measuring spoons
Mixing bowls, 1 large, 2 small
Pastry blender or fork
Whisk or fork
2 mixing spoons
Scraper
Small pan for melting fat
Baking pan (8"x8")
Wire rack
Hot pads

Order of Work
1. Make the topping first. Measure the brown sugar, cinnamon,
and flour into the small mixing bowl and mix well.
2.Measure the fat. Cut it into the flour-sugar-cinnamon mixture.
Ask someone to show you how to do this.
3. Add nuts (if you are using them) and mix well. Set topping
aside until you need it.
4. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
5. Lightly coat the baking pan with non-stick cooking spray.
6. Break the egg into the mixing bowl, and beat with a whisk
or fork.
7. Add the sugar, milk, and melted fat or oil to the egg, and
stir until all is mixed.
8. Sift the flour once; then measure it. Add to second small
mixing bowl.Add salt and baking powder. Stir flour mixture.
9. Add flour mixture to the egg mixture, and stir only until
dry ingredients are wet. The batter will look lumpy. Too much
mixing causes tunnels.
10. Put into the prepared pan. (Use the rubber scraper so that
you won’t waste batter.)
11. Use the mixing spoon to sprinkle the topping evenly over
the top of the batter in the pan.
12. Put into the preheated oven. Bake about 25 minutes. The
coffeecake will spring back when lightly touched and begin
to pull away from the edge of the pan when it is done. The top
will be a golden color dotted with the dark brown topping.
13. Take out of the oven. Allow pan to cool. Cut cake into
pieces while it is still in the pan. Use turner to remove cake
pieces from the pan. Serve warm.
​​Cakes

850 Half of one 8” or 9” layer Rich Chocolate

Cake (no icing): Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 301, p. 116.
Yield: 12 servings


Ingredients
3 squares unsweetened chocolate, melted
1 teaspoon flour
3 cups sifted cake flour
1/2 teaspoon salt*
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/4 cups unsalted butter*
2 1/4 cups sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
4 eggs
1 cup milk
Equipment
Small pan or microwave-safe bowl
3 8-inch** or 2 9-inch cake pans
Nonstick cooking spray
Large and small mixing bowls
Measuring cups and spoons
Sifter
Mixing spoon
Mixer
Rubber scraper
Toothpick or cake tester
Cooling rack(s)


Order of Work
1.Melt chocolate in small pan over low heat or in microwave
(following directions package) and cool to lukewarm.
2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly coat cake pan(s)
with nonstick cooking spray. Add 1 teaspoon flour to pan.
Rotate and shake pan until surfaces are coated with flour. Remove
excess flour. (Or cover bottom of pans with wax paper
instead of flouring pans.)
3. Lightly spoon cake flour into measuring cup; sift and then
measure. Place flour in small mixing bowl.Add salt and baking
powder to flour and mix well; set aside.
4. In large mixing bowl, use mixer to cream butter until soft;
gradually add sugar, mixing until mixture is very light and
fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes.Add vanilla and continue creaming.
5.Add eggs one at a time and beat well after adding each egg.
6. Add cooled chocolate to creamed mixture.
7. Add one-third of the sifted flour mixture and half of the
milk; repeat until all of the flour and milk are used.After each
addition of flour and milk, mix for 1 minute.
8. Pour batter into pan(s) and bake for 40 to 45 minutes for
8-inch or 9-inch pans. Use toothpick or cake tester to test
cake. Toothpick or cake tester should come out clean when
inserted into center of cake.
9. Remove from oven and cool on rack for 15 minutes before
removing from pan(s).


Half of one 8” or 9” layer Carrot or
Zucchini Cake (no icing):


Use recipe in 4-H
Cooking 301, p. 119. May use carrots or zucchini.
Yield: 16 servings


Ingredients
2 cups flour
2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup salad oil
4 eggs
3 cups carrots, shredded
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup nuts, chopped
Equipment
2 8-inch or 9-inch round cake pans
Nonstick cooking spray
Measuring cups and spoons
Large and medium mixing bowls
Mixer
Mixing spoon
Spatula
Cooling rack


Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly coat 2 8-inch or 9-
inch round cake pans with nonstick cooking spray.
2. Combine flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt in
medium bowl; mix well.
3. In large bowl, add oil and beat in eggs, one at a time.
4. Gradually add flour mixture to egg mixture and beat until
thoroughly mixed.
5. Add carrots, vanilla, and nuts; mix until thoroughly combined.
Pour into prepared pans.
6. For 8-inch or 9-inch round cake pans, bake 30 to 35 minutes
or until toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean.
Remove from oven and cool on wire rack. Store in refrigerator.
Variation: Substitute 3 cups shredded zucchini for shredded
carrots. Add one teaspoon ground nutmeg.


¼ of a Basic Chiffon Cake:

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 401, p. 118.
Do not use variations.
Yield: 16 servings


Ingredients
2 1/4 cups cake flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups sugar, divided
1/2 cup vegetable oil
5 large egg yolks
1 tablespoon vanilla
3/4 cup cold water
7 large egg whites
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar


Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.
2. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt, and 1
cup sugar.
3. Make a well in the center and add oil, egg yolks, vanilla,
and water.Whisk until smooth.
4. Beat egg whites and cream of tartar in large mixing bowl
until soft mounds begin to form.
5. Beating at high speed, sprinkle remaining 1/2 cup sugar
over egg whites, 2 tablespoons at a time. Beat until stiff peaks
are formed.
6. Gently fold one-third of the whites into the yolk mixture.
Fold in remaining whites.
7. Pour batter into an ungreased tube pan.
8. Bake 1 1/2 hours or until top springs back when lightly
touched. If cake pan has prongs around the rim for elevating
the cake, invert pan onto them. If not, invert pan over the
neck of a bottle or funnel so that air can circulate. Let the
cake cool completely, 2 to 3 hours.
9. Carefully run a metal spatula around the sides of the pan
to loosen cake. Remove cake from the pan and place on cake
plate. Cut slices by sawing gently with serrated knife.
Pies


One whole Double Crust Apple Pie:

Userecipes in 4-H Cooking 401, p. 105 and 97.
Leave pie in the disposable pie pan and place all in a zip-type
plastic bag. May use spice variation if desired.
Yield: 2 9-inch or 10-inch pie crusts or 3 8-inch pie crusts


Ingredients
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup shortening
5 to 6 tablespoons cold water


Order of Work
1. Thoroughly chill fat and water.
2. Place flour and salt together in medium bowl. Stir to mix.
3. Use a pastry blender, fork, or two knives to cut the fat into
the flour until the dough forms pea-sized pieces.
4.Add cold water one tablespoon at a time and sprinkle over
flour/fat mixture. Toss mixture lightly with a fork. DO NOT
STIR. Add only enough water to hold dough together. Let
dough stand at least 5 minutes. Shape into a ball, handling as
little as possible.
5. Chill dough 15 to 30 minutes.
6. Sprinkle 3 to 4 tablespoons of flour on a clean, dry surface
or pastry mat/cloth. Lightly coat a rolling pin with flour. Or
use two 18" x 18" sheets of waxed or parchment paper to roll
out dough.
7. Divide dough into two parts. Form one piece of dough into
circular shape and then flatten with rolling pin on pastry
mat/cloth or between two sheets of waxed or parchment paper.
8. Roll dough with short strokes from center to outer edge,
using a light, quick motion. Be careful not to roll over edge
of dough. Press on a different part of the dough with each
roll. Lift from surface occasionally. Roll about 1/8-inch thick
and slightly larger than the pie pan.
9. Fold dough in half, lift and place in pie pan, and unfold.
10. Beginning at center of pan and working toward edge,
gently press dough into pie pan. Do not pull or stretch dough
since that can ·make the pie crust shrink during baking.
11. Chill prepared pie crust for 20 to 30 minutes to prevent
crust from shrinking during baking.
12. Prepare filling.


Apple Pie Filling


Ingredients
1 prepared unbaked pastry for two-crust pie
5 cups peeled, sliced tart apples (5 to 6 apples)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3/4 to 1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 egg, beaten, or 2 tablespoons milk, if desired
1 teaspoon sugar, if desired


Order of Work
1.While preparing filling, place the prepared pie crust in refrigerator
for 20-30 minutes.
2. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
3. Rinse, peel, and core apples. Slice apples and place in
medium bowl. Sprinkle with lemon juice to prevent apples
from turning brown and toss gently.
4. In small mixing bowl, combine sugar, flour, and salt. Add
to apple slices and mix.
5. Spoon apple mixture into prepared pie crust.
6. Cut butter or margarine into small pieces and sprinkle on
top of apple filling.
7. Use cold water to moisten edges of the dough on the rim
of the pie pan.
8. Roll out remaining dough for upper crust.
9. Place upper crust on pie and press upper and lower edges
together on rim of pie pan.
10. Cut venting holes in top of pastry.
11. Use a knife to trim dough evenly around edge of pie pan.
12. Flute edge by placing left thumb and index finger 1/2 inch
apart on outside of pastry rim. With right index finger push
pastry between fingers or lightly press edges together with a
fork.
13. If desired, brush top crust with beaten egg or milk then
lightly sprinkle with sugar.
14. Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 350 degrees F.
Bake 25 minutes longer or until crust is brown.


Yeast Breads


​​Three Cinnamon Twists (no icing):

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 301, p. 42 & 44.

Sweet Dough Ingredients
¼ cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 package yeast
½ cup milk, heated to 100 to 110 degrees F
¼ cup water, heated to 100 to 110 degrees F
1/8 cup oil or melted butter
1 egg
½ teaspoon grated lemon rind, if desired
2 ½ cups all-purpose flour, approximately
Topping Ingredients
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon

Order of Work
1. Put sugar, salt, and yeast in mixing bowl. Mix well.
2. Place milk and water in microwave-safe bowl. Heat in microwave
for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from microwave and
check temperature with food thermometer. Pour warm liquids
over ingredients in mixing bowl and stir well. Allow
mixture to stand 1 to 2 minutes.
3. Add oil or butter, eggs, and lemon rind to mixture. Beat
until smooth.
4. Add 2 cups of flour to mixture and beat until smooth.
5. Add enough flour to make dough that is soft, but stiff
enough to handle.
6. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead
until dough is smooth, elastic, and does not stick to surface
or hands, about 8 to 10 minutes.
7. Place dough in a mixing bowl lightly coated with nonstick
cooking spray. Spray top of dough with nonstick cooking
spray and cover with damp, clean dish towel. Let rise in a
warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
8. Punch dough down and let stand 10 minutes.
9. Lightly coat baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.
10. Roll prepared dough into a square about 12" x 12."
11. Brush dough with melted butter. Mix sugar and cinnamon
in a small mixing bowl. Sprinkle center third of dough
with 3 tablespoons of sugar-cinnamon mixture. Fold one
third of dough over center third. Sprinkle with 3 tablespoons
of the sugar cinnamon mixture. Fold remaining third of
dough over the two layers.
12. Cut roll into 1-inch strips. Hold each end of a strip and
twist tightly in opposite directions. Firmly
13. Place on prepared baking sheet about 2 inches
apart. Brush top with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar cinnamon mixture.
14. Cover. Let rise in warm place until doubled in size.
15. Bake at 350 degrees F about 25 minutes or until lightly
browned.
16. Top with basic icing if desired.
​​Cookies


Three Snickerdoodle Cookies:

Use the Recipe in the 4-H Fair Recipe Book
Yield: 4 dozen cookies

Ingredients
1 ½ cups sugar
¾ cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
½ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon, ground

Order of Work
1. Preheat the oven to 400o F.
2. In a large mixing bowl, combine 1 ½ cups sugar and butter;
beat until light and fluffy.Add vanilla and eggs; beat well.
3. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking soda, cream of
tartar, and salt together; mix until well blended. Slowly add
the flour mixture to the butter and sugar mixture until well mixed.
4. Cover the bowl of dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate
the dough for about an hour.
5. Remove the dough from the refrigerator. Shape dough
into ½” balls.
6. In a small bowl, combine 2 tablespoons sugar and cinnamon.
Roll dough in this mixture and place 2 inches apart on
ungreased cookie sheets.
7. Bake at 400o F for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown.
Immediately remove cookies from the cookie sheets to wire
racks to cool.

 Three Chewy Granola Bars (gluten-free):

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 101, p. 35.
Yield: 12 bars

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups rolled oats, old-fashioned or quick
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 cup seedless raisins or dried fruit, chopped
2 eggs
1/3 cup butter or margarine, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Equipment
Mixing bowl and spoon
Measuring cups and spoons
Baking pan, 9"x9"

Order of Work
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly coat the baking pan
with non-stick cooking spray.
2. In bowl, combine oats, nuts, brown sugar, and raisins or
dried fruit.
3. Stir in eggs, margarine, and vanilla.Mix until evenly combined.
4. Press mixture firmly into the prepared baking pan.
5. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes. Cut into
12 bars.

 Three Brownies:

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking
101, p. 67. Nuts are optional.
Yield: 16 squares

Ingredients
1/2 cup sifted all-purpose flour
1/3 to 1/2 cup cocoa
1/3 cup butter or margarine (not reduced fat)
1 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 c
Equipment
Non-stick cooking spray
Flour sifter
Waxed paper
Measuring cups
Knife or spatula
Measuring spoons
Mixing bowl
Mixing spoon
Small microwave-safe bowl for melting fat
Small bowl
Scraper
Baking pan (8"x8" or 9"x9")
Hot pads
Wire racks
chopped nuts (optional)

Order of Work
1. Preheat the oven at 350 degrees F.
2. Lightly coat the baking pan with non-stick cooking spray.
3. Sift flour once; then measure it.
4. Measure cocoa. Sift flour and cocoa together onto waxed
paper and set aside.
5. Measure fat and melt it in the microwave. Time will vary
depending on microwave.
6. Pour melted fat into mixing bowl. Measure the sugar and
mix it with the melted fat until creamy.
7. Break one egg into a small bowl; then mix it well with the
sugar and fat. Do the same with the other egg.
8. Add the vanilla and mix.
9. Add the flour-cocoa mixture and stir until all is mixed.
10. Add the nuts and stir until they are mixed in.
11. Put into the prepared pan. Use the rubber scraper to clean
out the bowl.
12. Place into the preheated oven.
13. Bake for about 25 minutes or until brownies spring back
when lightly touched. They will be an even dark-brown color
on top. Brownies baked in a 9-inch-square pan will bake
quicker and be thinner than those baked in an 8-inch square.
14. Take the pan out of the oven. Use hot pads because the
pan is hot.
15. Place pan on a rack to cool. Cut into approximately 2-
inch squares to make 16 brownies.When cool, store in a container
with a tight lid.
​​Three Soft Pretzels:

Use recipe in 4-H
Cooking 301, p. 48. Use any one topping listed.
Yield: 14 pretzels


Ingredients
4 to 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1 package dry active yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 cup low-fat milk
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 eggs, lightly beaten
Poppy seed, sesame seed, coarse salt, or grated Parmesan
cheese


Order of Work

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In large bowl, combine 2
cups flour, sugar, undissolved yeast, and salt.
2. Heat milk, water, and oil until very warm (120 to 130 degrees
F).
3. Stir milk mixture into flour mixture until well combined.
4. Add enough of the remaining flour to make a soft dough.
5. Knead on floured surface until smooth and elastic, about
4 to 6 minutes.
6. Cover; let rest on floured surface 10 minutes.
7. Divide dough into 14 equal pieces.
8. Roll each piece into a 20-inch rope
9. Cover; let rest 5 to 10 minutes until risen slightly.
10. Shape into pretzels by curving ends of each rope to make
a circle; cross ends at top. Twist ends once and lay over bottom
of circle.
11. Place pretzels on two greased baking sheets.
12. Brush with beaten eggs. Bake for' 15 minutes.
13. Remove from oven; brush again with eggs and sprinkle
with poppy seeds, sesame seeds, coarse salt, or grated cheese.
14. Return to oven and bake for 15 minutes or until lightly
browned. Remove pretzels from baking sheet; let cool on
racks.


856 One loaf Oatmeal Bread:

Use recipe in 4-H Cooking 401, p. 25.
Yield: 2 loaves, 20 slices per loaf


Ingredients
2 packages active dry yeast
3/4 cup water, heated to 100 to 110 degrees F
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons melted butter or oil
2 cups milk
2 teaspoons salt
1 cup quick oats
3 cups bread flour
3 cups whole wheat flour


Order of Work
1. In a large mixing bowl combine yeast, water, and sugar; let
stand 10 minutes.
2. Stir in butter or oil, milk, salt, oats, and bread flour; beat
until smooth.
3.Mix in enough remaining whole wheat flour to form a soft
dough and until mixture begins to pull away from sides of
bowl.
4. On a lightly floured surface, turn out dough; knead until
dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 to 10 minutes.
5. Place dough in a large mixing bowl lightly coated with
nonstick cooking spray. Cover with clean, damp dishtowel.
Let rise in warm place, free from drafts, until doubled in size,
about 40 minutes.
6. Lightly coat two 9" x 5" loaf pans with nonstick cooking
spray; set aside.
7. Punch down dough and turn out on lightly floured surface.
Cover and let rest 10 minutes.
8. Shape into loaves. Place in prepared pans. Cover and let
rise until doubled, about 45 minutes.
9. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bake loaves 25 to 30 minutes,
until lightly browned and bread sounds hollow when
tapped.
10. Remove from pans and place on wire rack to cool.


Bread Made in a Bread Machine

One loaf Honey Whole Wheat Bread made
in a bread machine: Use the recipe in the
4-H Fair Recipe Book May be a 1-pound, 1 ½-
pound, or 2-pound loaf.


Ingredients

 1 pound loaf
1 ½ tsp. dry active yeast
1 1/3 C bread flour
2/3 C whole wheat flour
1 ½ tsp. salt
2 tsp. butter (cut in small pieces)
2 Tbsp. Honey
¼ C milk
¼ C water
1 large egg


Order of Work
1. Add the ingredients in the order specified in your bread
machine owner's manual.
2. Set the bread machine on the basic/standard bread making setting.
3. Select the medium or normal baking cycle.
4. Cool to room temperature before slicing.
​​
DIVISION 6036 - 4-H FOOD
PRESERVATION EXHIBIT

T864 Strawberry Jam: (half pint or smaller
jar), canned using a boiling water canner.


Use the recipe in the 4-H Fair Recipe
The USDArecommended headspace for jam is ¼ inch. Canning
label must be completed by member and affixed to the
jar.Write the type of fruit used on the canning label.

Publications FCS3-579

Refrigerator and freezer jams are not
appropriate for this class.
5 cups crushed strawberries (about 4 pints strawberries)*
1 package powdered pectin
7 cups sugar
About 8 half-pint (or 16 4-ounce) canning jars
*Strawberry jam is best made with fresh-picked, in-season
berries. If you use store-bought berries, be sure to mash them
up very well or you will get a lot of floating fruit and trapped
air in the final product.

1. Prepare the canner and jars as directed in Boiling Water
Canning, heating to 180°F (simmering). If you are using 4-
ounce jars and need to double-stack them, place a second
canning rack on top of the first
layer of jars. Continue to place jars in a single layer on top of
this second rack.
2. Rinse strawberries in a colander immediately before using.
Do not soak berries. Gently lift them out of water. Remove
caps.
3. Cut out and discard bruised spots, if needed.
4. Thoroughly crush berries one layer at a time in a deep baking
pan or cookie sheet using a potato masher. It is helpful to
place a damp dish towel or slip-proof mat under the pan to
prevent sliding.
5. Pre-measure 7 cups sugar into a bowl and set aside.
6.Measure 5 cups crushed strawberries and add to a stockpot.
7. Add 1 package of regular pectin to strawberries and stir
well. Turn burner under stockpot to high heat, stir constantly,
and bring to a full boil (bubbles over the entire surface).
8. Add the premeasured 7 cups sugar, continue stirring, and
heat again to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring
constantly. Do not boil longer. Longer boiling may damage
the pectin bond, causing jam to soften.
9. Remove from heat; quickly skim foam from top with a
slotted spoon.
10. Remove hot jars from canner and fill as directed in Boiling
Water Canning, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Use a jar
funnel for neater filling and check and adjust headspace if
needed.Wipe jar rims and apply lids.
11. Process in a boiling water canner as directed in Boiling
Water Canning. Process half-pint or 4-ounce jars for 10
minutes at altitudes up to 6,000 feet. If needed, 4-ounce jars
can be stacked in the canner by placing a second rack on top
of the first layer of jars and placing a second layer of jars on
top of this rack. Make sure water is 1 to 2 inches above tops
of all jars.

​​Candy

Three pieces Classic Chocolate Fudge (size:
about one inch square): Use recipe in 4-H
Cooking 401, p. 89. Nuts are optional.
Yield: 1 ½ pounds or 32 pieces


Ingredients
Butter, softened
2 cups sugar
3/4 cup half and half or whole milk
2 ounces unsweetened baking chocolate, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons corn syrup
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup coarsely chopped nuts, if desired


Order of Work
1. Line a 9" x 4" x 3" loaf pan or an 8" x 8" pan with foil, extending
the foil over the edges of the pan. Butter the foil and
set aside.
2. Butter the sides of a heavy 2-quart saucepan. In the
saucepan combine sugar, milk, chocolate, corn syrup, and
salt.
3. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until the mixture
boils. Clip a candy thermometer to the side of the pan.
4. Reduce heat to medium-low; continue boiling. Stir frequently.
5. Cook until the thermometer registers 234 degrees F. If no
thermometer is available, cook to the soft ball stage. Test by
dropping a small amount of syrup into cold water.
6.When candy reaches 234 degrees F, remove saucepan from
heat. Add butter and vanilla but DO NOT STIR.
7. Cool, without stirring or disturbing in any way, to 110 degrees
F. This should take 45 to 60 minutes.
8. Remove thermometer from saucepan. With a wooden
spoon, beat vigorously until fudge just begins to thicken. If
desired, add nuts. Continue beating until the fudge becomes
very thick and just starts to lose its glossy sheen. This should
take 5 to 10 minutes.
9. Immediately spread fudge in the prepared pan. Score the
pieces while still warm.
10.When fudge is firm, use the foil to lift out of the pan. Cut
fudge into squares.
11. Store fudge in a tightly cover

DIVISION 6036 - 4-H FOOD
PRESERVATION EXHIBIT

Dried Apples:

Dry apples according to
the instructions in the 4-H Fair Recipe Book
2 to 3 apples of your choice
2 cups vitamin C-enriched apple juice (enough to cover the
apples when sliced)
Cooking spray

1. If you are using an electric dehydrator, plug it in (so that it
is not touching anything) with the lid on the base. If you are
using an oven, slide oven racks to be 2 to 3 inches apart and
turn on oven. Preheat dehydrator or oven to 140°F.
2.Wash apples under cool running water.
3. Place enough apple juice in a bowl to cover the apples
when sliced.
4. Core and peel the apples. Cut away any bruised or damaged
areas. Carefully cut apples into 1/8-inch thick pieces,
either as slices or rings.
5. To prevent browning, place the apple pieces into the bowl
of juice as they are cut. Soak the apple pieces in the juice for
3 to 5 minutes.
6. Spray drying tray lightly with cooking spray. This will prevent
sticking.
7. Remove the apple pieces from the juice, place briefly on
paper towels to remove excess juice, and then place the
pieces in a single layer on the drying tray. Place the drying
tray into the preheated dehydrator or oven.
8. Dry at 140°F for approximately 6 to 12 hours in a dehydrator.
Plan to start checking for doneness in 3 hours and
check every hour or half-hour until done. Oven drying may
take 12 to 24 hours. If using an oven, leave the door cracked
open to allow moist air to escape. Place a fan outside the oven
near the door to speed up drying time.
9. When dry, the apple pieces should be bendable, but not
sticky. If a piece is folded in half, it should not stick to itself.
You should not be able to squeeze any moisture from the
fruit. Do not let the apples dry so long that they become
crispy.
10. After drying, cool the dried apples 30 to 60 minutes before
packaging. Packaging warm fruit could lead to sweating
and mold growth.
11. Once they are cool, put the dried apples into a sealable
airtight container. Label the container with the name of the
fruit and the date.

Boiling Water Canning

Follow these general instructions for boiling water canning
Choice Salsa, Dill Pickles or Strawberry Jam.
Prepare canner and jars:


1. Assemble equipment and ingredients.
2. Place rack in bottom of boiling water canner. Fill canner
half full with clean, hot water and place on burner. Turn heat
on medium-high to heat water in canner to the temperature
specified in each recipe (180°F, simmering, for hot packed
Choice Salsa and Strawberry Jam; 140°F, almost simmering,
for raw packed Dill Pickles).
3. Only use jars that were specifically made for home
canning. (Do not re-use containers such as mayonnaise jars.)
Use only the jar sizes specified in each recipe. Examine jars
carefully. Discard any with cracks or chips in the rim. Examine
ring bands and discard any with rust or bends.
4.Wash jars thoroughly in warm soapy water, rinse well, and
place them in the canner to stay warm until ready to use.
5.Wash ring bands and prepare lids as instructed by the manufacturer.
6. Heat 3 to 4 cups hot water in a medium saucepan for
adding to canner, if needed.

Prepare the recipe:
As directed for each product.

Fill the jars:


1. Slowly remove jars from hot water with jar lifter. Carefully
empty any water back into the canner. Place jars upright
on towel-covered countertop or rack.
2. Fill jars as directed in each recipe, leaving the required
headspace. Headspace is the gap between the top of the food
and the top of the jar rim.Measure headspace with headspace
tool or ruler to ensure it is correct.
3. Place lid on canner and turn heat to high. Bring water in
canner to a strong boil and then start a timer, using the time
specified in the recipe for your altitude. Be sure to maintain
a steady boil throughout the entire timing process.
4. Once the timer goes off, turn off heat. Remove canner lid,
lifting the underside of the lid away from you to direct the
steam away from your face. Wait 5 minutes for the contents
of the jars to settle.
5. After 5 minutes of cooling, remove jars from the canner
one at a time using a jar lifter, keeping them upright. Be careful
not to tilt them. Place jars at least 1 inch apart on a dry
towel or cake-cooling rack. Place away from drafts of moving air.
6. Let jars cool, undisturbed, for 12 to 24 hours. Check jars
for vacuum seals. The lids on sealed jars will be indented and
will not flex when pressed.
7. Remove ring bands from sealed jars and wipe jars. Store
in a cool, dark, dry place. Store unsealed or opened jars in
the refrigerator and eat within one week.

 Salsa: (pint jar or smaller) canned using

A boiling water canner.
Use the recipe in the
4-H Fair Recipe


6 cups (about 5 pounds) tomatoes (red, orange, yellow or
green)
9 cups (about 3 pounds) onions and/or peppers of any variety*
1½ cups commercially bottled lemon or lime juice
3 teaspoons canning or pickling salt
About 6 pint (or 12 half-pint) canning jars *Red, yellow or
white onions may be used and will slightly affect the overall
flavor.More bell peppers make a milder salsa, while hot chili
peppers make a spicier salsa. It is important to the safety of
the salsa that you use no more than 9 cups total of onions and
peppers.


1. Prepare canner and jars as directed in BoilingWater Canning,
heating to 180°F (simmering).
2. Peel tomatoes: Fill a stockpot with enough water to cover
several tomatoes at a time. Bring water to a boil while preparing
tomatoes. Fill a large bowl with ice (if you have it) and
cold water. Wash tomatoes. Cut an “x” in the non-stem end
of tomatoes with the tip of a small knife. Place 2 to 3 tomatoes
at a time in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until
skins split. Remove tomatoes with a slotted spoon and place
in cold/ice water. Slip off tomato skins and discard them.
Place tomatoes on a clean cutting board.
3. Carefully use a knife to remove the firm inner core from
tomatoes. Coarsely chop tomatoes (into blueberry-sized pieces).
4. Peel, rinse, trim and dice onions in ¼-inch pieces.
5. Bell peppers: Rinse peppers. Remove stems, seeds and
membranes. Dice peppers in ¼-inch pieces.
6. If using hot peppers: Place food handling gloves on both
hands. Rinse and dry hot peppers. Remove stems and remove
the seeds and membranes, unless you want more spicy heat.
Dice hot peppers into very small pieces. Remove and discard
gloves.Wash hands well.
7. Measure and combine 9 cups of peppers and onions with
6 cups of tomatoes in a large stockpot. You can vary the individual
amounts of peppers and onions to suit your taste,
but be sure that they measure 9 cups in total. Measure and
add 1½ cups bottled lemon or lime juice and 3 teaspoons salt.
Stir to mix ingredients evenly.
8. Heat to boiling over high heat and then reduce to a simmer
and cook for 3 minutes, stirring as needed to prevent scorching.
9. Remove hot jars from canner and fill as directed in Boiling
Water Canning, leaving ½-inch headspace. Use a jar
funnel for neater filling and be sure to release air bubbles and
adjust headspace if needed.Wipe jar rims and apply lids.
10. Process in a boiling water canner as directed in Boiling
Water Canning. Process pint or half-pint jars for 15 minutes
at altitudes of 1,000 feet or below; 20 minutes at altitudes of
1,001-6,000 feet.

863 Dill Pickles: (pint jar or smaller),
canned

using a boiling water canner: Use the recipe
in the 2017 4-H Fair Recipe Book
The USDA recommended headspace for
pickles: ½ inch. Canning label must be
completed by member and affixed to the jar.
Publications Home Canning Pickled and
Fermented Foods (FCS3-582)


About 9 pounds (36) pickling cucumbers, 3 to 4 inches long
3 cups water
3 cups vinegar (5% acidity)
6 tablespoons canning salt
10 to 11 heads of fresh dill or 1½ teaspoons dried dill weed
or dill seed
3 to 3 ½ tablespoons whole mustard seed
3 to 7 cloves of garlic (optional)
About 6 to 7 pint (or 12 to 14 half-pint) canning jars (use
wide mouth jars for easier packing)


1. Prepare canner and jars as directed in BoilingWater Canning,
heating to 140°F (almost simmering).
2. Rinse cucumbers in a colander immediately before using.
Scrub well, giving special attention to the area around the stems.
3. Remove a 1/8-inch slice off the blossom end of each cucumber
and discard. If stem is still attached, cut off all but ¼
inch. Carefully slice the cucumbers lengthwise and then
lengthwise again to create spears.
4. If using fresh dill, chop leaves finely with scissors, separating
into small piles of 1½ heads per pile. If using garlic,
peel and slice cloves into thin slices.
5. Make the pickling brine: Combine 3 cups water, 3 cups
vinegar and 6 tablespoons salt in a large saucepan. Bring to
a boil over high heat
6. Remove hot jars from canner as directed in BoilingWater
Canning. Place 1½ heads of chopped dill or 1½ teaspoons
dried dill weed or dill seed in the bottom of each jar. Add ½
teaspoon mustard seed to
each jar. Add ½ to 1 clove of sliced garlic to each jar, if desired.
(Use one-half those ingredient amounts if using halfpint
jars.)
7. Pack cucumber spears tightly into the jars, leaving ½-inch
or more of headspace. (If using half-pint jars, it may be necessary
to trim the length of the cucumber spears.) Ladle boiling
pickling solution over the cucumbers in the jars, leaving
½-inch headspace. Use a jar funnel for neater filling and be
sure to release air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed, as
directed in BoilingWater Canning.Wipe jar rims and apply lids.
8. Process in a boiling water canner as directed in Boiling
Water Canning. Process pint or half-pint jars for 10 minutes
at altitudes of 1,000 feet or below; 15 minutes at altitudes
of 1,001-6,000 feet.
9. For best flavor, store sealed jars for 3 weeks before eating.

Pressure Canning

Follow these general instructions for pressure canning Green
Beans and other low-acid foods (vegetables, meats, poultry,
and combination recipes).
Prepare canner and jars:
1. Assemble equipment and ingredients.
2. Place rack into pressure canner.Add 2 to 3 inches of water
and place on burner. Turn burner on medium-high to heat
water in canner to 140°F (almost simmering) for a raw pack,
or 180°F (simmering) for a hot pack.
3. Only use jars that were specifically made for home canning.
(Do not re-use containers such as mayonnaise jars.) Use
only the jar sizes specified in the recipe. Examine jars carefully.
Discard any with cracks or chips in the rim. Examine
ring bands and discard any with rust or bends.
4.Wash jars thoroughly in warm soapy water and rinse well.
To keep jars warm until use, either fill jars with hot water and
place upright in the canner or cover jars with hot water in a
clean, drain-plugged sink.
5.Wash ring bands and prepare lids as instructed by the manufacturer.


Prepare the recipe:
As directed for raw pack or hot pack.
Fill the jars:


1. Remove jars from hot water with jar lifter and pour water
out in sink (not in canner). Place jars upright on towel-covered
countertop or rack.
2. Fill jars as directed in the recipe, leaving the required headspace.
Headspace is the gap between the top of the food and
the top of the jar rim.Measure headspace with headspace tool
or ruler to ensure it is correct.
3. Remove air bubbles by slowly moving bubble freer or
spatula gently in and out around the inside edge of each jar.
Check headspace of each jar again and gently add or remove
liquid with a small spoon, if needed.
4.Wipe jar rims with a clean, damp paper towel.
5. Apply lids according to manufacturer’s directions. Turn
band onto jars until fingertip tight. Fingertip tight is when
you meet firm resistance as you turn the band onto the jar
using your thumb and two fingers.


Pressure canner processing:


1. Use a thermometer to check that the temperature of the
water in the canner is as specified in the recipe (140°F for a
raw pack; 180°F for a hot pack). Adjust burner higher or
lower, if necessary.
2. Use a jar lifter to carefully place filled jars one at a time on
the rack in the canner. Keep jars upright at all times. Water
level will rise, but should not cover jar tops. Remove water
if needed.
3. Place lid on canner and close tightly, but leave the weight
off the vent port. Turn heat to high.Wait until you see steam
form a funnel as it comes out of the vent port, and then set a
timer for 10 minutes. Allow steam to escape for 10 minutes
to vent the canner (remove excess air).
4. After the canner has vented for 10 minutes, place the
weight or close the vent port to begin pressurizing the canner.
5. Determine how many pounds of pressure are needed for
processing at your altitude. For a weighted gauge canner, this
is 10 pounds at altitudes of 1,000 feet and below; 15 pounds
at altitudes above 1,000 feet. For a dial gauge canner, it is 11
pounds at altitudes of 2,000 feet and below; 12 pounds at altitudes
of 2,001 to 4,000 feet; or 13 pounds at altitudes of
4,001 to 6,000 feet.
6. Wait until you can see and hear the weight steadily jiggling
as recommended by the manufacturer (for a weighted gauge
canner) or the dial indicates the recommended pressure (for
a dial gauge canner). Set the timer for the processing time
specified in the recipe. Once the recommended pressure is
reached, you may lower the heat very slightly so that pressure
does not rise too high, but be careful. If at any time the pressure
drops below the recommended level, you must bring the
canner back to pressure and reset the timer to the full recommended processing time.
7. When the timer sounds, turn off the heat.Allow the canner
pressure to drop naturally as the canner cools.Wait until the
pressure returns to 0 pounds (if the canner has a vent lock, it
will drop) and then wait 2 more minutes. If the canner gives
no indication of the remaining pressure, set a timer for 45
minutes to allow time for the pressure to drop to zero. Carefully
check that the pressure is gone before removing the
weight from the vent port.
8. After removing the weight, wait 10 minutes for the contents
of the jars to settle. Remove the canner lid, lifting the
underside of the lid away from you to direct the steam away
from your face.
9. Remove jars from the canner one at a time using a jar lifter,
keeping them upright. Be careful not to tilt them. Place jars
at least 1 inch apart on a dry towel or cake-cooling rack. Place
away from drafts of moving air.
10. Let jars cool, undisturbed, for 12 to 24 hours. Check jars
for vacuum seals. The lids on sealed jars will be indented and
will not flex when pressed.
11. Remove ring bands from sealed jars and wipe jars. Store
in a cool, dark, dry place. Store unsealed or opened jars in
the refrigerator and eat within one week.


 Green Beans: (One pint), canned using a pressure canner.


Use the recipe in the 4-H Fair Recipe Book


8 to 9 pounds green beans (¾ to 1 pound per pint)
9 cups water
4½ teaspoons canning salt (optional)
About 9 pint canning jars


1. Prepare the canner and jars as directed in Pressure Canning,
heating to 140 °F (just below simmering) for a raw
pack or 180°F (simmering) for a hot pack. See step 5, below.
2. Fill a large saucepan with 9 cups water to be used to fill
jars. Cover saucepan with lid and turn heat on high to bring
to a boil.
3. Use a colander to rinse beans. Discard any discolored or
diseased bean pods.
4. Use your clean hands to snap the ends off the beans, and
then snap the beans into 1-inch pieces. Or, use a small knife
to cut off ends and slice into 1-inch pieces.
5. Green beans can be canned using either a raw pack or a
hot pack. Raw packs are quicker, but hot packs tend to have
the best color and flavor.


Choose one of the packs below for filling jars and process as
directed.
Raw Pack:


6. Remove jars from hot water as directed in Pressure Canning,
pouring the water out in the sink (not in the canner).
7. Use a jar funnel and clean fingers to push raw beans tightly
into hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace.
8. Add ½ teaspoon salt to each jar, if desired.
9. Using a ladle, fill each jar with boiling hot water to cover
beans, leaving 1-inch headspace.
10. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed, as directed
in Pressure Canning.Wipe jar rims and apply lids.
11. Process pint jars for 20 minutes in a pressure canner, as
directed in Pressure Canning. Be sure to vent the canner before
pressurizing and use the correct processing pressure for
your altitude and type of canner.


OR


6. Place beans into the boiling water in the saucepan for 5
minutes. Turn off heat.
7. Remove jars from hot water as directed in Pressure Canning,
pouring the water out in the sink (not in the canner).
8. Use a jar funnel and slotted spoon to fill the hot jar with the
heated beans, leaving 1-inch headspace. Repeat to fill each jar.
9. Add ½ teaspoon salt to each jar, if desired. Using a ladle,
fill each jar with the boiling hot cooking liquid to cover the
beans, leaving 1-inch headspace.
10. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed, as directed
in Pressure Canning.Wipe jar rims and apply lids.
11. Process pint jars for 20 minutes in a pressure canner, as
directed in Pressure Canning. Be sure to vent the canner before
pressurizing and use the correct processing pressure for
your altitude and type of canner.
Beans may be ‘raw packed’ or ‘hot packed’ but the packing
method used must be indicated on the label. The USDA recommended
headspace for green beans is 1 inch. Canning
label must be completed by member and affixed to the jar.